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Category Archive for 'Grants & Fellowships'

Based at the Center for Community Partnerships, the Civic Engagement Fellow will work closely with staff and offices across campus, including the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life and the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship, to engage students and support faculty in civic engagement endeavors.

This is the first year of this one-year graduate fellowship to provide support for civic engagement activities on Wesleyan’s campus. The position starts in July (exact date is flexible) and runs for 12 months.  Applicants must be a graduate of Wesleyan University. There is a stipend provided, (exact amount to be set, this year it would have been $24,000) and health coverage provided.  Interested applicants should fill out the application by April 10th at 5pm.

All details and application: http://www.wesleyan.edu/ccp/fellowship.html

The Christopher Brodigan Fund was established in memory of Christopher Brodigan, a Wesleyan student who died in an accident in his frosh year. The Fund pays tribute to Christopher’s deep interest in Africa and to the public service he provided through teaching in Botswana prior to entering Wesleyan. Awards will be made to graduating Wesleyan seniors (first priority) and recent Wesleyan graduates who plan to pursue public service or research (in that order of preference) on the African continent.

Students from any discipline are encouraged to submit applications proposing a public service or research project. Service projects should be carefully designed to provide some form of valuable assistance to people in Africa. Students may propose to provide service in educational institutions, development organizations, grassroots groups, or non-governmental organizations pursuing service work. Research projects will be supported especially if it is likely to provide concrete benefits to African society or to contribute to the student’s ability to serve African interests in some capacity.

Several awards averaging $3,000 each will be offered. Applicants are strongly encouraged to consult with a member of the African Studies faculty (see Faculty listing on this website) while formulating their proposals. Recipients are required to submit reports on their projects once they are completed.

Application Instructions (2012)

Applications should include:

  1. A proposal (2 pages) which includes the following information:
    1. Description of project
    2. Plan for carrying out the project
    3. Identification and description of any sponsoring organization
    4. If appropriate, the proposal should address any concerns regarding safety or political sensitivity
  2. A budget, including airfare and room and board costs (1 page)
  3. A resume, including a listing and description of relevant Wesleyan coursework or other experiences
  4. The name of one faculty member who can serve as a reference for you and for your project

Applications should be submitted by email to Professor Mike Nelson of the Government Department (mbnelson@wesleyan.edu).

Applications are due by 4pm Friday, April 6, 2012. Awards will be announced prior to graduation.

Additional information available at http://africa.blogs.wesleyan.edu/brodigan/.

 

Attention, Seniors! Unsure of what to do next year? Looking for a job with significant responsibilities and learning opportunities?  Interested in a career in teaching, writing, or the arts?

Look no further. Apply for the Wesleyan Writing Fellowships! Every year, the Writing Programs awards three graduating seniors with prestigious one-year, post-graduate fellowships:

Two Ford Fellows assist the Director of Writing Programs in running the university’s Writing Programs and Writing Workshop, including training more than one hundred student writing tutors. The position offers significant teaching and administrative experience.

The  Shapiro Center/Russell House Arts Fellow organizes and supervises the writing and music events and helps with other literary events on campus. The job offers an opportunity to work with distinguished writers, journalists, and other artists.

For more information, come to the information session this Thursday to hear Professor Anne Greene, Director of Writing Programs, speak about the program.

Current Ford Fellows Katherine  Mechling ’11 and Anya Backlund ’11, as well as current Shapiro Center/Russell House Arts Fellow Barbara Fenig ’11 will be available to speak about their experiences and answer questions.

If you are unable to attend but are interested in the Fellowships, contact russellhouse(at)wesleyan(dot)edu or writingworks(at)wesleyan(dot)edu for more information.

Date: Thursday, February 23
Time:
 12 – 1 PM
Location: 
Shapiro Creative Writing Center Lounge (Allbritton 318)

Applications for the Fellowships are due on Friday, March 30. Visit the Writing at Wesleyan webpage for further information and application requirements for the Ford Fellowship and the Shapiro Center/Russell House Arts Fellowship.

Come find out how to apply for this $10,000 grant to support projects promoting peace during the summer of 2012.  All Wesleyan undergraduates are eligible to apply and interested applicants are strongly encouraged to attend one of the info sessions.

  • Wednesday November 30, Noon in Usdan 108
  • Tuesday December 6, Noon in Usdan 108
Applications are due Friday January 27.

All information is available at http://www.wesleyan.edu/ocs/peace/index.html

Any questions, contact Cathy Lechowicz, clechowicz@wesleyan.edu

The two Macy interns will be selected on the basis of those characteristics associated with John Macy: high intellectual ability, a capacity for sustained effort in difficult tasks, strong ethical standards, an ingrained sense of duty, and commitment to public service as a worthy career  During the past 25 years the Macy interns have worked at the Government Accountability Office.

There will be a number of very specific requirements such as a detailed budget, a letter of commitment from a sponsor, and an essay (2 – 3 pages) describing your interest in public policy/public service.

There is a remote possibility that the GAO might be able to accept interns during the summer of 2012. The Macy Interns are responsible for finding their own internships in public policy and/or public service. The Macy Internship will no longer be restricted to Washington, DC.

Application deadline: March 6, 2012.

For more information, contact

Vicky Zwelling
Associate Director
Career Center
crc@wesleyan.edu
860-685-2180

The MATCH Corps is a one-year Urban Education fellowship program. It is possibly the most competitive such program in the nation, more competitive than admission to the Harvard Graduate School of Education or Teach for America.

Elite recent college graduates from excellent universities across the country commit one year to public service in Boston. They are assigned 6-7 MATCH students at the beginning of the year, with whom they work in small group or 1-on-1 tutorials over the course each day, doing close academic support and building relationships. They receive housing and a modest living stipend. After that, some go into teaching; some to med school and law school; and others get involved in public policy.

The goal is clear: college success for each student. Most would become the first in their families to achieve that. Therefore, the demands are intense: many Corps members work 60 hour weeks, usually with two students at a time.

MATCH Corps members work relentlessly to build in-depth relationships with their students, acting as mentors and helping their students to reach specific goals. Corps members have close contact with parents and guardians, building the strong bridge between home and school that is an important part of the MATCH philosophy. The school environment is small enough that every Corps member knows every student.

For more information, go to the MATCH Corps website at http://www.matchschool.org/matchcorps/howitworks.htm

The Barbara Jordan Health Policy Scholars Program is open to individuals with a strong interest in eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities. Eligible candidates must be U.S. citizens who will be either a senior at or a recent graduate of an accredited 4-year college or university in the fall of 2012. Individuals with a graduate degree and those individuals currently enrolled in a graduate degree program are not eligible to participate. The application deadline is 5 p.m. ET on Friday, December 16, 2011. Application materials and more information are available online at http://bjordanscholars.kff.org/.

Come find out how to apply for this $10,000 grant to support projects promoting peace during the summer of 2012.  All Wesleyan undergraduates are eligible to apply and interested applicants are strongly encouraged to attend one of the info sessions. Applications are due Friday January 27.
All information is on our website: http://www.wesleyan.edu/ocs/peace/index.html.
Any questions, contact Cathy Lechowicz, clechowicz@wesleyan.edu.

Info session dates:

  • Wednesday November 2, 4pm in Usdan 110
  • Thursday November 10, 4pm in Usdan 110
  • Monday November 14, 7pm in Usdan 110
  • Wednesday November 30, Noon in Usdan 108
  • Tuesday December 6, Noon in Usdan 108

Seniors: Fulbright grants are available for study and research in 135 countries. Fifty-five of those countries offer the opportunity to work as a teaching assistant for English, under the supervision of an experienced teacher. Certain creative projects can also be undertaken with Fulbrights. The typical Fulbright grant covers roundtrip travel, living expenses, and university fees (if applicable).

The campus deadline is 4 PM on Tuesday, October 4. The official Fulbright Web site is at http://www.fulbrightonline.org; click on U.S. Students. Supplementary instructions may be found at http://www.wesleyan.edu/german/fulbright.html. If you decide to apply, please get in touch immediately with the campus Fulbright Program Advisor, Prof. Krishna Winston of the German Studies Department. Her drop-in hours are posted weekly; on the Wesleyan home page, click on Academics and then on Faculty to find her listing.

The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship is a competitive national program that provides college graduates the opportunity to work in Washington, DC, with one of twenty-seven participating public-interest organizations focusing on international security issues.  The program has awarded 134 fellowships since its inception in 1987 and is offered twice yearly, in the spring and fall.  It lasts from six to nine months and provides a stipend, health insurance, and travel costs to Washington.  The Scoville Fellowship does not award grant or scholarship money to students.

Scoville Fellows may undertake a variety of activities, including research, writing, education, and advocacy in support of the goals of their host organization and may attend coalition meetings, policy briefings, and Congressional hearings.  Fellows have written articles, blogs, fact sheets, letters to the editor, op-eds and reports, organized talks and conferences, and been interviewed as experts by the media.  Former Scoville Fellows work for U.S. and international NGOs, the Departments of State and Defense, members of Congress and academia, and attend graduate school in political science or international relations, following their fellowships.

Students interested in peace and security issues should visit the Scoville website at www.scoville.org.  Although the majority of Scoville Fellows have received college degrees in political science, government, international relations, history, or peace studies, we do not require any specific major.  There is no application form; application requirements are listed on our website, as are links to the websites of each of the participating groups and information on the work of current and former Scoville Fellows.  The next application deadline is October 3, 2011 for the spring 2012 fellowship.

All U.S. citizens, as well as non-U.S. citizens living in the U.S. who have an appropriate work permit, are eligible to apply; foreign nationals living outside the United States are not.

For additional information, contact

Paul Revsine
Program Director
Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship
322 4th Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 446-1565
www.scoville.org

Want $25,000 to follow your dream in countries outside the U.S. after graduation?

Come to an informational meeting about the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship

Monday, April 11 at 4:15 p.m. PAC 001

With Dean Brown and Davy Knittle, Watson Fellow ’11-‘12

Be there to learn about this amazing opportunity!!

All members of the junior class are invited to apply for a semester-long Student Fellowship at the Center for the Humanities during the 2011-12 academic year. Wesleyan’s is among the first such university humanities centers established and serves to bring together Wesleyan faculty, students and visiting scholars for extended exploration of selected subjects. Our 2011-12 themes are “Fact and Artifact” (Fall semester) and “Visceral States: Affect and Civic Life” (Spring semester).  Descriptions of these themes are appended below.

Four Student Fellowships are awarded by the Center’s Advisory Board for each semester.  Student Fellows share an office at the Center and take part in Center activities. Among these events are the Center’s Monday lecture series; colloquial discussions on Tuesdays, 10:30-1:00; and occasional Center conferences. One course credit is awarded for a Student Fellow’s participation in the Center’s activities.

Applicants for a Student Fellowship must be planning to do a senior project (an honors thesis) on a topic related to the Center theme for the year.  The project need not be underway at the time of the application.  The themes, “Fact and Artifact” and “Visceral States: Affect and Civic Life,” are broadly construed and connect with projects and problems across the disciplines. Faculty Fellows who will work at the Center during Fall semester are Professors Askamija (Art History), Autry (Sociology), Fullilove (History), Stark (Sociology and Environmental Studies), and Tucker (History, SISP, FGSS). Faculty Fellows who will work at the Center during the spring semester are Professors Chakravarti (Government and Social Studies), Kauanui (American Studies and Anthropology), Rodriguez Mosquera (Psychology), Visvardi (Classical Studies), and Wright (African American Studies and History). There will also several Visiting Research Fellows and Postdoctoral Fellows.

More information about the fellowship and the application process is available on the Center for the Humanities website at http://www.wesleyan.edu/chum/student_fellowship_09_10.html

Applications for student fellowships are due at the Center by Friday, March 25th.

Professor Joel Pfister, Chair of the English Department, and Professor Anne Greene, Director of Writing Programs, would like to inform students of the following prizes and fellowships.  Unless otherwise indicated, all entries are due by March 3, 2011 by 5:00 PM.

Most of the prizes and fellowships are open to juniors, except where specified. We invite juniors to apply for the Annie Sonnenblick Writing Awards, which support juniors who wish to undertake an independent writing project during the summer between their junior and senior years. We strongly encourage students to apply.  This year we will be selecting multiple recipients.

We also encourage juniors to apply for summer Olin Fellowships. The fellowships may be used for work in English outside the Wesleyan course structure. Suitable projects may include, study in an academic program, research, training in research methods, or sustained work on a piece of writing.

Juniors who expect to attend graduate school after Wesleyan will be interested in the Winchester Fellowships. The Winchester Fellowships are awarded to graduating seniors and recent graduates to support graduate work in literature or writing.

Juniors are also welcome to apply for the Wesleyan Writers Conference Scholarships. They should note that the deadline is March 24th, 2011.

Please instruct students to visit the Writing Prizes website for prize and fellowship information: http://www.wesleyan.edu/writing/prizeinfo.html

If you have, or will have, need-based financial aid loans through Wesleyan, you are eligible to apply for the Wesleyan Service Careers Fellowship (SCF) loan-forgiveness award.

The SCF award recognizes demonstrated commitment to public service and interest in leading a life of service after graduation.  Since its inception in 2005, the SCF legacy has grown to over 60 Wesleyan alumni.

If you are engaged in service, and see service and civic engagement as a permanent part of your life after Wesleyan, then consider applying.  Ten members of the class of 2012 will be awarded up to $5,000.00 for loan forgiveness, applicable to a previous loan while at Wesleyan, or toward your financial aid loans for senior year.

The application deadline is Thursday, March 31, 4:30pm at the CRC.  For details, visit: http://www.wesleyan.edu/crc/students/grants/fellowships/service_careers.html

INFORMATION SESSION: Wednesday, March 2, 5:00pm-5:30pm, CRC Library.  If you cannot attend the info session, see Jim Kubat during drop-in hours at the CRC on Thursdays, 1:00pm-4:30pm, or see Cathy Lechowicz at the Office of Community Service.

Please visit http://www.wesleyan.edu/chum and follow the Student Fellowship link for application.

Application Deadline: March 25, 2011

All members of the junior class are invited to apply for a semester-long Student Fellowship at the Center for the Humanities during the 2011-12 academic year. Wesleyan’s is among the first such university humanities centers established and serves to bring together Wesleyan faculty, students and visiting scholars for extended exploration of selected subjects. Our 2011-12 themes are “Fact and Artifact” (Fall semester) and “Visceral States: Affect and Civic Life” (Spring semester).  Descriptions of these themes are appended below.

Four Student Fellowships are awarded by the Center’s Advisory Board for each semester.  Student Fellows share an office at the Center and take part in Center activities. Among these events are the Center’s Monday lecture series; colloquial discussions on Tuesdays, 10:30-1:00; and occasional Center conferences. One course credit is awarded for a Student Fellow’s participation in the Center’s activities.

Applicants for a Student Fellowship must be planning to do a senior project (an honors thesis) on a topic related to the Center theme for the year.  The project need not be underway at the time of the application.  The themes, “Fact and Artifact” and “Visceral States: Affect and Civic Life,” are broadly construed and connect with projects and problems across the disciplines. Faculty Fellows who will work at the Center during Fall semester are Professors Askamija (Art History), Autry (Sociology), Fullilove (History), Stark (Sociology and Environmental Studies), and Tucker (History, SISP, FGSS). Faculty Fellows who will work at the Center during the spring semester are Professors Chakravarti (Government and Social Studies), Kauanui (American Studies and Anthropology), Rodriguez Mosquera (Psychology), Visvardi (Classical Studies), and Wright (African American Studies and History). There will also several Visiting Research Fellows and Postdoctoral Fellows.

Applications for student fellowships are due at the Center by Wednesday, March 25th.

We will let you know of the Center Advisory Board’s decision by April 6.  If you have any questions, please call the Center at extension 3044. An open house for interested students will be held on Tuesday, March 1, 4:00-5:00 p.m in the Center for the Humanities lounge.

Next Year’s Themes:

Fact and Artifact (Fall 2011)

To what extent has the modern fact been redefined as artifact, as an entity shaped by human hands? Scholars have at once recognized the production of facts about the empirical world as a central achievement of modernity and redefined facts not as paragons of objectivity but as markers of human intervention. Facts thus are alternately seen as a triumph of knowing or as products of social processes shaped by tools of witness, communities of inquiry, and methods of narration. Scholars of language, art, narrative, historical epistemology, philosophy, and archaeology have contributed to our understanding of how people fashion facts, which may in turn be accepted as veridical statements about reality or called into question as the conceptions of interested and historically situated human beings. They have explored, for instance, the practices and technologies used in apprehending the natural world: e.g. those used when collecting plants for herbaria and gene banks, or when tagging nutrients with radioisotopes. They have considered, too, the epistemological claims of aesthetic realism, the implication of historical facts in rhetorically constructed narratives, and the very possibility of establishing objects of knowledge in the humanities as facts in the sense in which that term has been used in the sciences. These investigations draw and redraw the lines between fact and artifact and fact and fiction – that is, not what we know to be true or false, but rather how we think we know it.

The Center invites applications examining the career of the modern fact and its uncomfortable companion, the artifact.

Under what conditions can facts be created? How do efforts to pin down empirical reality gain access to the material world? How do they depend upon symbolic or aesthetic logics of representation or produce such representations? What is at stake in the legal and moral order of facts? Does new knowledge change people’s aesthetic or moral sensibilities or alter their understandings of their first-hand experiences? What light can the study of artifacts shed on the status and function of facts in our world?

Visceral States: Affect and Civil Life (Spring 2012)

The term “affect” encompasses a range of bodily and social experiences that has traditionally been defined in contradistinction to rationality: visceral reactions, feelings, emotional attachments, and states of mood. Recent studies across the disciplines, from literature to political theory to neuroscience, have complicated this definition by according a foundational role to affect in human behavior and cognition. These inquiries destabilize the grounds on which affect has been excluded from rationalist discourses in both academic and public realms. This “affective turn” thus affords new possibilities for understanding aesthetics, reasoning, art, personal experience, power and the civic sphere, posing as well new problems for the conceptualization of feelings, emotion, and mood.

The Center invites applications examining the possibilities and challenges accompanying new attention to the complex relations between emotional subjectivities, visceral experiences, and public life.  Our inquiry is organized around a broad scope of intra- and interdisciplinary questions, including: can the deployment or solicitation of affect in civil life be understood as complementary to—or even partially constitutive of—reasoned debate? How might fields such as moral philosophy, social theory, and psychology adjudicate between canonical rationalist frameworks and those proposing constitutive dynamics of affect? To what extent do aesthetic representations and practices provide grounds for new approaches to the interplay of affect, subjectivity, and sentiment in social life?

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