Feed on
Posts
Comments

Category Archive for 'Feet to the Fire'

It is our pleasure to invite you to this year’s Earth Day Celebration: “Keeping Our Feet to the Fire: Joining Art and Science to Engage Environmental Issues.”

The event will feature a world premier screening of Paul Horton’s film: “Connections Within a Fragile World.”

There will also be a panel discussion asking the question: are art and science as natural allies in communicating environmental issues to the public.  This will be moderated by Jeremy Isard ’11, with panelists:

  • Godfrey Bourne, University Missouri St. Louis
  • Marda Kirn, EcoArts Connections, Colorado
  • Cassie Meador, Liz Lerman Dance Exchange, Washington, D.C.
  • Barry Chernoff, Wesleyan University

As always, we will award the Schumann Prize for Distinguished Environmental Stewardship to a member of the Class of 2010

An open reception will follow the event.

So, please join us for Earth Day Celebration 2010.

Thursday, 22 April, 8:00 p.m.
CFA Hall (formerly CFA Cinema)

Free and open to the public.

November 7, 2009
Exley Science Center, Room 150

  • 9:00 a.m.
    Global Environmental Change and Freshwater Resources: Hope for the Best or Change to Prepare for the Worst?

    Patrick L. Osborne, PhD
    Executive Director
    Harris World Ecology Center, University of Missouri – St. Louis
  • 10:15 a.m.
    Water in a Changing Climate – The Role of the National Forests in the Water Infrastructure

    Frank H. McCormick, PhD
    Program Manager
    Air, Water and Aquatic Environments
    Rocky Mountain Research Station

Both events are sponsored by the Robert Schumann Lectures Series in the Environmental Studies Program. For more information, please contact Valerie Marinelli, vmarinelli@wesleyan.edu.

Feet to the Fire has commissioned four faculty members to create new works about climate change, and two of them premiere tomorrow, Friday, April 17.

The first is a noontime concert, Glacier by Alvin Lucier, professor of music, in Crowell Concert Hall.  The second is a solo entitled, Liquid Shakti, by Hari Krishnan, artist-in-residence in the department of dance, and is included in the Spring Faculty Dance Concert at the CFA Theater, tomorrow and Saturday at 8pm.  More information is below and at the Feet to the Fire website.

We do hope you will be able to attend.

  • Alvin Lucier: Glacier
    Friday, April 17, 12:15 p.m. – 12:45 p.m. (no latecomers)
    Crowell Concert Hall
    Free Admission

    During the course of a half hour performance of Glacier, a cellist slowly sweeps downward, tracking a graph of the mean mass balance of 30 glaciers over a 24-year period, from 1980 to 2004. Glacier was written by Alvin Lucier, music professor, for Lucy Strother ’11.

  • Spring Faculty Dance Concert:
    Goddess, Siren, Monster, and Liquid Shakti

    Friday & Saturday, April 17 & 18, 8:00 p.m., CFA Theater
    Tickets: $8 faculty/staff, $6 students

    Patricia Beaman and Hari Krishnan, two Artists-in-Residence at Wesleyan University, have long shared a mutual fascination with the similarities between their respective forms, Baroque dance and Bharata Natyam. In both, the compositional principles are found in antique texts, the narratives of the dances are rooted in mythology, and the formulaic structures are inextricably linked to music. In Goddess, Siren, Monster, and Liquid Shakti, they have collaborated on a suite of solo dances featuring iconic female figures from Greco-Roman and Hindu mythology. Juxtaposing the traditional forms and mythological subject matter of Baroque dance (Beaman) and Bharata Natyam (Krishnan) with modern movement and contemporary issues, they propel the classic stories of Venus, Armide, Scylla, and Ganga into the present.

    Costumes by Leslie Weinberg and lighting by John Carr, both of Wesleyan University, in addition to an international collaborative team from the US and Canada. Liquid Shakti has been commissioned by Wesleyan University’s Feet to the Fire.

For tickets or more information, call the box office at 860-685-3355 or purchase online anytime at http://www.wesleyan.edu/CFA

Filmmaker, eco-activist, and reality-TV survivor Shalini Kantayya, from 7th Empire Media, presents her film A Drop Of Life during this year’s Wesleyan University Earth Day Celebration.

Shalini Kantayya appeared on the television reality show On the Lot, created by Steven Spielberg to find Hollywood’s next great director. Out of more than 12,000 filmmakers, she was the only woman to finish in the top ten.

Her production company, 7th Empire Media, is committed to using media to give a powerful voice to the unheard. Her film, A Drop Of Life, a futuristic sci-fi flick about the mounting global water crisis, has been used by The African Water Network, as an organizing tool in more than 40 villages across Africa.

Set in the near future, A Drop Of Life is the story of two women, a village teacher in rural India and an African American corporate executive, whose disparate lives intersect when they are both confronted with lack of access to clean drinking water.

Join us for our annual Earth Day Celebration at Wesleyan University’s Center for the Arts Cinema on Wednesday, April 15 at 7:30 p.m.   This filming is free and open to the general public, with a reception immediately following.

The Earth Day Celebration is sponsored by The Robert Schumann Lecture Series for the Environmental Studies Program at Wesleyan University, in collaboration with Feet to the Fire: Exploring Global Climate Change from Science to Art and the Environmental Organizer’s Network (EON).

For more information, please contact Valerie Marinelli at vmarinelli@wesleyan.edu or (860) 685-3733.

Those of you who participated in the Common Moment dance at Foss Hill during orientation week might want to check out the short video which has been posted to the Feet to the Fire website.

More videos and images are available in the Feet to the Fire Gallery.

“Where On Earth Are We Going?” is the title of the 4th Annual Robert Schumann Environmental Studies Symposium, a series of three seminars dedicated to global climate change issues which will be taking place on Saturday, October 18, 2008 from 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. in Tischler 150 in the Exley Science Center.

  • 9:00 a.m. – Climate Policy: A Progress Report.  More than 160 countries, including the United States, have signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Learn about how the latest results from the 2007 assessments have re-framed debates about climate policy at home and around the world. Presented by Gary Yohe, Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics and a senior member and coordinating lead author on the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which was a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.
  • 10:15 a.m. - The Many Psychologies of Global Warming Given the Hard Realities We Face.  The unprecedented nature, scale and gravity of the accelerating climate crisis is producing a wide range of psychological responses. Emerging psychology paradigms such as regulation theory help elucidate them, and there are signs of adaptive mastery of “future traumas” that suggest realistic hope as our species gears up to deal with global warming. Presented by William Blakemore ’65, former Wesleyan trustee, and television correspondent for ABC News for 38 years.
  • 11:30 A.M. – Global Climate Change – The Role of the Carbon Cycle in Global Warming.  The emissions of carbon dioxide from energy use and land use (deforestation) are contributing to global warming. Alternative sources of energy and alternative land uses have the potential, however, to reduce emissions or even enhance carbon sinks. Join us for an update on the net effect of our carbon management initiatives. Presented by Dr. Richard A. Houghton, deputy director and senior scientist at the Woods Hole Research Center in Falmouth, Massachusetts, an independent, nonprofit institute focused on environmental science, policy, and education.

These seminars are sponsored by The Environmental Studies Program and the Feet to the Fire campus-wide initiative.  For more details contact Valerie Marinelli (860)685-3733 or vmarinelli@wesleyan.edu.

Check out these scenes from the First Year Matters/Feet to the Fire Common Moment on August 29, 2008. Photos by Nick Lacy.

off the beaten pathOff the Beaten Path: A Jazz & Tap Odyssey explores the American art forms of jazz and tap and their unique cultural influences. The full-evening performance was created under the direction of award-winning New England dancer/choreographer Drika Overton and musician, composer and educator Paul Arslanian, in collaboration with renowned tap dancers Brenda Bufalino and Josh Hilberman (Wesleyan ’88). Fusing heritage with innovation, Off the Beaten Path: A Jazz & Tap Odyssey weaves diverse themes inspired by Rachel Carson, pioneer of the modern environmental movement, throughout the production’s storyline into an exhilarating and compelling journey for audiences of all ages to experience. The performance will take place on Friday, September 5, at 8:00 p.m. Additional details and information on how to purchase tickets is available from the Center for the Arts.

winina ladukeOn Wednesday, September 3, at 4:15 p.m. in the Memorial Chapel, Winona LaDuke, an environmental and political activist will welcome the Wesleyan community back to campus with an address on “Indigenous Thinking about a Post Carbon, Post Empire Economy.” LaDuke is an Anishinaabekwe (Ojibwe) enrolled member of the Mississippi Band Anishinaabeg who lives and works on the White Earth Reservations, and is the mother of three children. At the age of 18, she spoke in front of the United Nations regarding Indian issues and since has become known as a voice for American Indian economic and environmental concerns throughout the United States and internationally.

As Program Director of the Honor the Earth Fund, she works on a national level to advocate, raise public support, and create funding for frontline native environmental groups. She also works as Founding Director for White Earth Land Recovery Project. A graduate of Harvard and Antioch Universities, LaDuke has written extensively on Native American and Environmental issues, including the novel Last Standing Woman (1997), the non-fiction book All our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life (1999), and Recovering the Sacred: the Power of Naming and Claiming (2005), a book about traditional beliefs and practices. LaDuke enlightens audiences about issues of racism and social injustice suffered as a result of contact with white people and the colonialism that followed. LaDuke’s storytelling reflects many aspects of traditional, Anishinabe culture, including a sustenance lifestyle and the importance of community, ceremony and respect for all things.

On the evening on Thursday, August 28, members of the Class of 2012 took part in a survey on climate change.  Here are the results:

What do you see as the greatest threat resulting from climate change?

    threats histogram

  1. Threat to water resources. (16%)
  2. Threat to ecosystems. (37%)
  3. Threat to food. (7%)
  4. Threat to coasts. (5%)
  5. Threat to health. (9%)
  6. Warm spells/heat waves. (3%)
  7. Heavy precipitation events. (3%)
  8. Area affected by drought increases (4%)
  9. Intense tropical cyclone activity increases (4%)
  10. Increased incidence of extreme high sea level (14%)

What do you see as the most effective adaptation or alleviating factor to reduce the impact of climate change?

    alleviation histogram

  1. Stabilizing carbon emissions at the rate existing between the years 2000 – 2030 (17%)
  2. Stabilizing carbon emissions at the rate predicted between the years 2020 – 2060 (7%)
  3. Stabilizing carbon emissions at the rate predicted between the years 2050 – 2090 (3%)
  4. Adaptation of agricultural planning (4%)
  5. Coastal zone infrastructure (1%)
  6. Reinvestment in infrastructure and design of cities (11%)
  7. Adaptation to water use (4%)
  8. Adaptation to human health planning (3%)
  9. Reduction in pollution from domestic and industrial sources (24%)
  10. Strengthening of energy transmission and distribution (26%)

north end peninsula

The north-end peninsula of Middletown is an area of spectacular beauty and unique aquatic and riparian ecology in the Connecticut River watershed. The north-end peninsula contains a converted sanitary landfill as well as the recycling center and the remnant of the old Remington Building that built both type writers and munitions during World War I. The Coginchaug and Matabesset rivers converge at the north-end peninsula just below the Cromwell Meadows. Professor Chernoff will talk about aquatic conservation efforts on the Matabessett and Coginchaug Rivers as well as the efforts of the Jonah Center to develop the area sustainably for residents while protecting the ecosystem. All of these efforts include involvement of Wesleyan students. Students will follow the lecture with a trip to the land fill and North-End Peninsula. This is an ongoing research and community involvement project to transform an important piece of Middletown and to protect our environment. The lecture will take place in Usdan 108 at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, August 30. The trip to the North End Peninsula will follow the lecture.

lermanThe Feet to the Fire Common Moment is being led by the world renowned Liz Lerman Dance Exchange. The event features a dance performance by Wesleyan students with a special performance by students and community members on bicycles, tricycles and unicycles. As part of the performance, students will assemble in the shape of a histogram that outlines the results of a campus poll on global climate change. The night will conclude with a performance of fire-dancing by Wesleyan student group Prometheus.

The Common Moment takes place on Friday, Aug. 29 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Foss Hill.

pine islandThe Feet to the Fire/First Year Matters Common Reading Discussions that will be taking place on Thursday, August 28, from 7:00-8:15 p.m. are based on two sets of “texts:”

1. The first set of texts is four articles on the topic of global climate change that were made available over the summer:

  • Suketu Mehta, “Lost Horizons” (2007)
  • Edward T. Nickens, “Walden Warming” (2007)
  • T. Root, et al., “Fingerprints of Global Warming on Wild Animals and Plants” (2003)
  • Juliana Spahr, “Unnamed Dragonfly Species” (2002)

All four articles are available through the Wesleyan Library eReserve system (course: fym001; password: fym001) and all first-year students are expected to have read them before arriving on campus.

2. The second set of texts is four faculty lectures on the topic of global climate change that will be taking place on Thursday, August 28, from 4:00-5:30 p.m. All new students are expected to attend one of these lectures:

  • “Changing the Moral Climate” (Professor Elise Springer, Philosophy)
  • “Climate Policy and Interdisciplinary Scholarship” (Professor Gary Yohe, Economics)
  • “Decision Time: A Scientist and Humanist Discuss Energy Scarcity and Global Climate Change” (Professor Brian Stewart, Physics, and Professor Krishna Winston, German Studies)
  • “Social Knowledge and Climate Change” (Professor Paul Erickson, History)

The Common Reading Discussions are meant to provide new students with an opportunity to share their ideas on global climate change with faculty and other community members in a relaxed setting. Following these discussions at 8:15 p.m., RAs will prepare new students for the Common Moment with Liz Lerman Dance Exchange that will be taking place on Friday, August 29, from 7:30-9:30 p.m., by taking polls and helping them create wish ties.

Feet to the Fire logo

Feet to the Fire combines the teaching power of art and field science to help students and the community better understand the implications of global climate change. Feet to the Fire has partnered with the First Year Matters during New Student Orientation to bring the following programs to you:

  • Common Readings. Four articles on the topic of climate change– Suketu Mehta, “Lost Horizons” (2007), Edward T Nickens, “Walden Warming” (2007), T. Root, et al., “Fingerprints of Global Warming on Wild Animals and Plants” (2003), and Juliana Spahr, Unnamed Dragonfly Species (2002)–are available through the Wesleyan Library eReserve system (password: fym001) and should be read before you arrive on campus.
  • Faculty Lectures. On Thursday, August 28, from 4:00-5:30 p.m., four different lectures on the topic of climate change will take place: “Changing the Moral Climate” (Professor Elise Springer, Philosophy), “Climate Policy and Interdisciplinary Scholarship” (Professor Gary Yohe, Economics), “Decision Time: A Scientist and Humanist Discuss Energy Scarcity and Global Climate Change” (Professor Brian Stewart, Physics, and Professor Krishna Winston, German Studies), and “Social Knowledge and Climate Change” (Professor Paul Erickson, History).
  • Common Reading Discussions. On Thursday, August 28, from 7:00-8:30 p.m., faculty will be in the residence halls to lead discussions of the common reading assignments and the faculty lectures. This will provide students with an opportunity to share their ideas with faculty and other community members in a relaxed setting, and to begin preparing for the Common Moment the next day by taking polls and creating wish ties.
  • Common Moment. On Friday, August 29, from 7:30-9:30 p.m. join the world renowned Liz Lerman Dance Exchange as they stage a once-in-a-lifetime movement happening on Foss Hill for all new students. You’ll embody the results of a residence hall poll. We need your participation to make this historic collective expression about climate change a success.
  • Field Trip to the North End Peninsula of Middletown. On Saturday, August 30, from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m., Professor Barry Chernoff (Biology and Earth & Environmental Science) will present a lecture on aquatic conservation efforts along the Coginchaug and Matabesset rivers entitled “The North End Peninsula of Middletown: Conservation, Ecology and Sociology.” The lecture will be followed by a field trip to this spectacularly beautiful and unique aquatic and riparian ecosystem that contains a converted sanitary landfill and the remnants of a munitions plant from World War I.
  • Welcome Address. On Wednesday, September 3, at 4:15 p.m., Winona LaDuke, and environmental and political activist who is the founding director of the White Earth Land Recovery Project, will welcome the Wesleyan community with an address on “Indigenous Thinking about a Post Carbon, Post Empire Economy.”
  • Jazz and Dance Performance. On Friday, September 5, at 8:00 p.m., award-winning dancer/choreographer Drika Overton and musician/composer Paul Arslanian will present a work inspired by Rachel Carson, founder of the modern environmental movement, entitled “Off the Beaten Path: A Jazz and Tap Odyssey” in collaboration with renowned tap dancers Brenda Bufalino and Josh Hilberman.