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Category Archive for 'Safety & Security'

As the semester begins we want to share with you information about the resources on campus to address sexual violence.  As you know, the University has a very clear policy prohibiting all forms of sexual misconduct and assault:  http://www.wesleyan.edu/studenthandbook/3_sexual_misconduct.html.  Every member of the community is expected to know and follow the policy.  As a community there are several things we can do to reduce the likelihood that members of our community will experience the trauma of an assault.  While the responsibility for any sexual misconduct lies with the perpetrator, there are many actions people can take to reduce the risk becoming a victim:

  • Set your own sexual boundaries and communicate them clearly to a potential sexual partner before becoming intimate.
  • Notice your fears and act on them. Your instincts are usually right.
  • Look for signs of a lack of respect. If someone does not respect your personal space or your wishes, it is possible they won’t respect you in a sexual situation either.
  • Be especially cautious in a new environment with unfamiliar people. This applies whether you are on campus, off campus or traveling. Avoid going to isolated rooms or areas with someone you do not know well.
  • Never leave a party or gathering with someone you don’t know well, and don’t accept a ride from a stranger.
  • Attend social gatherings with friends and leave with them. Make a plan for the evening and stick to it to ensure everyone’s safety.
  • Watch your alcohol and other drug use. Studies of rape indicate that up to 75 percent of victims were under the influence of alcohol or other drugs at the time of the assault, often provided by the assailant. For the same reasons that it is important to remain sober to control a car, it is equally important to stay sober in order to maintain control of your judgment and be able to legally give consent.

While we hope that we can reduce the number of assaults on campus, we want to be sure that if an assault occurs you know what resources are available across campus.  Nearly a dozen professional staff on campus have received specialized training and form the Sexual Assault Resource Team (SART):  http://sexualviolence.blogs.wesleyan.edu/.  These staff can answer questions about what a student can expect if they file a report of an assault and they are fully aware of all of the counseling resources on and off campus.  If you have any questions about the SART trained staff, please contact Joyce Walter, Director of the Davison Health Center (jwalter@wesleyan.edu).  In addition to the staff on campus, the University has hired a Sexual Assault Resource Team (SART) Intern who also can serve as a liaison for students seeking resources.  This year’s SART intern Eliza Gordon ’11 can be contacted at ejgordon@wesleyan.edu or you can visit her office in the Davison Health Center, 327 High Street – 2nd floor room 208. Please check out the sexual violence blog for the SART intern’s office hours.

Sincerely,

Joyce Walter
Director of the Davison Health Center

Rick Culliton
Dean of Students

The offices of Public Safety and Residential Life would like to welcome back all continuing students.  We also want to take this opportunity to share some important information with you.

  • All students who have a car on campus must register their vehicle with Public Safety, and park only in designated student lots.  Public Safety will begin ticketing immediately. Parking rules and regulations remain in effect even when classes are not in session.
  • The RIDE route has been changed to better accommodate students.  Students will no longer need to transfer at the Exley Science Center. Go to the Transportation website for this and other updated information- http://www.wesleyan.edu/transportation/.
  • The Zip car program begins its second year – go to http://www.zipcar.com/wesleyan for more information.
  • Please remember to carry your keys with you at all times. Lockouts cost $10.00 and will be posted to student accounts.
  • Please remember to secure your residence at all times.   Even when in your space, make certain to utilize window locks and keep screens in place.  In the past, squirrels, bats and even a turkey have found their way into University buildings through open windows and doors.  In the event that an animal makes its way into your residence, please contact workorder at x.3400 during regular business hours or Public Safety at x.2345 evenings and weekends.  If you are missing a window screen, report it to workorder immediately.
  • The Campus Fire Safety department will soon begin conducting room safety inspections in all residential facilities. Please refer to http://www.wesleyan.edu/firesafety for fire safety guidelines.

In closing, we want to remind you to

  • lock your doors and windows
  • not leave your keys in your door
  • not leave your possessions unattended or unsecured, and
  • report suspicious persons or activities to Public Safety immediately at 685-2345 or 685-3333.

Thank you in advance for helping us to keep our community safe.  Have a great semester!

At the end of the spring term, Wesleyan’s Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Committee and Code of Non-Academic Conduct (CNAC) Review Committee forwarded proposals to me that the University’s AOD policies be amended to prohibit the misuse of prescription drugs and to prohibit open containers of alcohol on University property.  I am writing to notify you that these policy changes will become effective for the upcoming fall term.

The misuse of prescription drugs, whether for recreational purposes or to enhance academic performance, has become a major problem nationally.  Students have increasingly expressed concern about this issue, and Wesleyan’s AOD policy will now specifically prohibit the misuse or abuse of any prescription medication.

Wesleyan policy also will prohibit open containers of alcohol on University property beginning this fall.  This change brings our policy more in line with our peers, and should help us address problems associated with transient public drinking, clarify expectations for alcohol use on University property, and resolve discrepancies between University policy and existing City ordinances.  The new policy will not prevent students of legal age from responsibly consuming alcohol in their residences (or in the backyards of senior houses); nor will it apply to registered events, such as University-sponsored activities, approved student parties, Spring Fling, etc.  At the suggestion of some of the student leaders with whom I’ve consulted, members of the Wesleyan community who are of legal age will be permitted to responsibly consume alcohol on Foss Hill during daylight hours.

The faculty and staff members involved in these lengthy discussions are unanimously in support of these policy changes, while most students instead support greater educational efforts.  I believe that these policy changes together with more robust educational interventions will be helpful in reducing illegal and unsafe AOD use on our campus.

I am grateful for the efforts of the students, faculty and staff who served on these important committees, and look forward to continuing to work with them to address these issues in the coming year.

Best wishes for a restful summer,

Dean Mike

Almost half of college students have experienced abuse in a relationship, according to a 2008 study. Abuse can range from cyber-stalking to beatings and rape.

Four experts will look at relationship violence on campuses, how to recognize danger signs and get help at the Hartford Courant and FOX CT Key Issues Forum, “The Person You Think You Know: Signs and Solutions of Campus Violence.” The forum will be held on Tuesday, April 27 at Wesleyan University’s Beckham Hall – Fayerweather Building – from 6 to 7:15 p.m. The Fayerweather Building is located at 47 Wyllys Avenue in Middletown.

Panelists are:

  • Jaclyn Friedman, Wesleyan class of ’93, who is a performer and co-editor of “Yes Means Yes! Visions of Female Sexual Power and a World Without Rape.”
  • Connie J. Kirkland, director of sexual assault services at George Mason University in Virginia and a national expert on campus stalking.
  • Janet Peckinpaugh, a 30-year broadcast journalist with her own media marketing firm who has been a victim of stalking and domestic violence.
  • Claire Potter, professor of American studies and history at Wesleyan University, whose research interest includes the study of violence against women.

MODERATED BY: Laurie Perez, reporter, FOX CT

The event is co-sponsored by the Hartford Courant and FOX CT, and presented in partnership with Wesleyan University. It is free and open to the public. Anyone interested in attending is encouraged to register by email at corpaffairs@courant.com or by calling 860-241-3614. Limited parking is available in Lot E or T; additional street parking can be found on Mt. Vernon, Washington Terrace and High Street. Visit http://www.wesleyan.edu/about/campusmap.html for a campus map.

To schedule an interview with moderator Laurie Perez or any of the panelists, please contact Andrea Savastra at 860-241-3934 or by e-mail: asavastra@courant.com.

Almost half of college students have experienced abuse in a relationship, according to a 2008 study. Abuse can range from cyber-stalking to beatings and rape.

Four experts will look at relationship violence on campuses, how to recognize danger signs and get help at the Hartford Courant and FOX CT Key Issues Forum, “The Person You Think You Know: Signs and Solutions of Campus Violence.” The forum will be held on Tuesday, April 27 at Wesleyan University’s Beckham Hall – Fayerweather Building – from 6 to 7:15 p.m. The Fayerweather Building is located at 47 Wyllys Avenue in Middletown.


Panelists are:

· Jaclyn Friedman, Wesleyan class of ’93, who is a performer and co-editor of “Yes Means Yes! Visions of Female Sexual Power and a World Without Rape.”
· Connie J. Kirkland, director of sexual assault services at George Mason University in Virginia and a national expert on campus stalking.
· Janet Peckinpaugh, a 30-year broadcast journalist with her own media marketing firm who has been a victim of stalking and domestic violence.
· Claire Potter, professor of American studies and history at Wesleyan University, whose research interest includes the study of violence against women.

MODERATED BY: Laurie Perez, reporter, FOX CT

The event is co-sponsored by the Hartford Courant and FOX CT, and presented in partnership with Wesleyan University. It is free and open to the public. Anyone interested in attending is encouraged to register by email at corpaffairs@courant.com or by calling 860-241-3614. Limited parking is available in Lot E or T; additional street parking can be found on Mt. Vernon, Washington Terrace and High Street. Visit http://www.wesleyan.edu/about/campusmap.html for a campus map.

To schedule an interview with moderator Laurie Perez or any of the panelists, please contact Andrea Savastra at 860-241-3934 or by e-mail: asavastra@courant.com.

Although residential units are open during Spring Break, there will not be many people around.  If you will be on campus, follow appropriate safety protocol.  Please report emergencies and suspicious activities to Public Safety at 860-685-3333.

If you will be leaving campus for Spring Break, please do the following:

  • Unplug electrical outlets
  • Close blind/window treatments
  • Take home aquarium pets
  • Lock windows and doors
  • Take home valuables
  • Empty trash
  • Turn off lights and alarms

Have a restful break!

The Campus Climate Log provides a way to inform the campus community about hate incidents and acts of intolerance, and it lists educational interventions and prevention efforts organized by students and staff. The Log–developed in 2007–was a collaboration between the Wesleyan Student Assembly (WSA) Student Life Committee and the Office of Student Affairs/Dean’s Office. In the Fall 2009, the position of Dean of Diversity and Student Engagement was reorganized to report to the Office of the Vice President for Diversity and Strategic Partnerships. As the Dean of Diversity and Student Engagement, I chair the Campus Climate Log Committee and direct the review and update of the Log.  For more information about the Campus Climate Log, please visit http://www.wesleyan.edu/deans/climate/ or send an email Renee Johnson-Thornton, Dean for Diversity and Student Engagement, at rjohnson01@wesleyan.edu.

Twenty common-sense campus safety tips from PSafe:

  1. Travel in groups of two or more at night and always walk in well lit, heavily traveled areas.
  2. Take the safest routes on campus, not always the fastest.
  3. Stay on the part of the sidewalk that is farthest away from shrubs, dark doorways and alleys.
  4. Share your class schedule with friends and family, effectively creating a buddy system.
  5. When you go out, let someone know where you are going and when you plan to be back.
  6. Know the locations of the Blue Light (Emergency) phones on campus.
  7. Use the RIDE vans after dark.  After the vans have stopped running for the night, call a friend or Public Safety for a ride back to your residence.
  8. Always listen to your instincts—your gut feeling—it may be alerting you to a dangerous situation or that something is not quite right.  When you get that feeling, get away from the situation.
  9. DO NOT leave your belongings unattended, even for a few minutes.
  10. Avoid displaying large amounts of cash or other tempting targets, such as jewelry or expensive clothing.
  11. Always lock your bike to a bike rack with a heavy U Lock.
  12. Always lock your car and keep valuables out of sight.  Check the back seat before getting in the vehicle.
  13. When approaching your vehicle, have your keys in hand for a quick entry.
  14. Park in well-lit, well-traveled areas of campus.
  15. Program the number to Public Safety into your cell phone: 860-685-3333 (emergency) or 860-685-2345 (routine).
  16. Remember that alcohol and/or drugs are involved in up to 90% of crimes on college campuses.
  17. If jogging alone in deserted areas or late at night, carry some type of personal protection device, such as pepper spray, personal alarm, etc.  Be sure to check campus policy on carrying personal protection.
  18. Learn to be safety conscious.  Thinking that crime will never effect you is wrong and it’s usually when you let your guard down that you may not recognize a dangerous situation.
  19. Enroll in a RAD self-defense class.  Look for information on this from Public Safety.
  20. Wherever you are, stay in control of what goes on around you.  Stay aware and alert to your surroundings and the actions of people around you.

As you prepare for the Thanksgiving Holiday, remember to lock all doors and windows whether you will be remaining on campus or leaving for the break! Also, please consider taking home your bikes and other belongings that you will not need through the winter. If you are staying on campus over the break period, remember to walk in well lit areas after dark, preferably in groups, and report suspicious people to Public Safety immediately at 860-685-3333 or x3333 from a campus phone line. Although the RIDE program will not be operating Thursday through Saturday, Public Safety will provide escorts for individuals upon request. Public Safety’s general phone number is 860-685-2345.

As you finalize your travel arrangements for the winter break, remember that the residential units will close for the fall semester at 12:00 noon on Wednesday, December 23, 2009. All residential units, with the exception of the wood frame houses, will close at this time. Students can return to campus at 9:00 am on Sunday, January 17, 2010.

There will be a limited number of employment opportunities for students looking for work on campus during winter break. Students wishing to do so must request housing with Residential Life by December 2, 2009. Requests should be made through the Winter Break web site at http://www.wesleyan.edu/reslife/ugrad_housing/winter_closing.html. Please note: Housing is not guaranteed during the winter break period, students who are granted permission to live in their units during the break will be notified by December 11, 2009.

Please come to the steps of Olin tonight, Wednesday, October 21st at 7:00 p.m. for the annual Take Back the Night march.

Show your support for survivors of sexual assault and abuse. Listen to their stories. Everyone’s presence is important.

Take a stand and break the silence because everyone deserves to be safe.

We will begin at Olin and march around campus. We will form speak-out circles in which survivors can share their stories (talk, read poems, sing, cry, yell, or request a moment of silence) in a supportive environment. Staff from the Office of Behavioral Health and Health Services will be present at TBTN and are always available through their on call system. There will be a candlelight vigil to end the march followed by debriefing sessions in Usdan led by counselors from the Women and Families Center.

“A Day of Remembrance, Violence Prevention, and Healing: A Symposium” will take place on Friday, October 15, from 1:00 – 6:00 p.m. with speakers and workshops on personal safety, healing, and being an ally.

Sympoisum-FINAL FLYER

Sponsored by ResLife, WesWell, the Usdan Center, the Office of Diversity and Strategic Partnerships, the Office of Student Affairs, and Emily Schatzow P’09

The University’s Alcohol and Other Drug Committee is unveiling a new blog called “Know Your Rights and Responsibilities”. The focus of the blog is to give students access to important health, safety and policy information about alcohol and at the same time list activities for students who may choose not to drink. The blog will be distributed electronically throughout the academic year prior to large scale events where alcohol is served and likely to be a major focus. We hope you find the blog a useful tool for making healthy decisions around alcohol.

As of this writing, we have no known cases of H1N1 on this campus.  We expect that we will have cases soon and that H1N1 will be an issue this semester and likely the whole of the academic year.  Because most cases thus far have been equivalent to seasonal flu in terms of intensity, we expect the impact it causes to be manageable.  We have a solid plan in place which is well supported at all levels of the university.

We have compiled a set of recommendations for H1N1 mitigation in frequently asked questions format and published them online at emergencymanagement.blogs.wesleyan.edu.  These will be updated as new information becomes available.

More detailed information about H1N1 is available at www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/, and www.ct.gov/ctfluwatch.  We will update this website as new information becomes available.

How does H1N1 spread?

Like other flu viruses, novel H1N1 influenza spreads from an ill person to others mainly through coughing or sneezing.

What are the symptoms of H1N1?

Symptoms of the flu may include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.  Influenza-like illness is defined as a fever plus cough and/or sore throat.  Some people with influenza will not have fever.  Absence of fever does not mean absence of infection.  If in doubt, call your health care provider to discuss your symptoms.  Students are encouraged to call the Davison Health Center flu line (860) 685-2653 Monday-Friday 9-4 and the 24-hour line (860) 685-2470 at other times.

How is H1N1 diagnosed?

Current practice guidelines per CDC and the Connecticut Department of Public Health are for clinical diagnosis of H1N1 infection.  Testing is being reserved for hospitalized and severely ill patients and for investigation of local outbreaks.  The diagnosis of H1N1 will be made on the basis of symptoms and physical exam findings.  Influenza-like illness is defined as a fever of 100° F [37.8° C] or greater plus cough and/or sore throat.  Some people with influenza will not have fever.  Absence of fever does not mean absence of infection. In many cases, the diagnosis may be able to be made over the telephone.  The criteria for diagnosis are deliberately broad.  Some people will meet these criteria and turn out not to have H1N1.  In the interest of public health and per recommendations, we will treat people who meet these criteria as if they have H1N1 until they meet the clearance criteria which are absence of fever (100° F [37.8° C] or greater), or signs of a fever, without the use of fever-reducing medications for at least 24 hours.

Is anyone at special risk of complications from H1N1 infection?

Pregnancy and other previously recognized high risk medical conditions from seasonal influenza appear to be associated with increased risk of complications from this novel H1N1. These underlying conditions include asthma, diabetes, suppressed immune systems, heart disease, kidney disease, and neurocognitive and neuromuscular disorders.  Speak with your health care provider and determine whether or not you qualify as high risk of complications from H1N1 infection.

How can transmission of H1N1 be controlled?

The four main tools available at this time are hand hygiene, respiratory etiquette, routine cleaning and self-isolation of those who are ill.

Hand hygiene

Influenza may spread via contaminated hands or inanimate objects that become contaminated with influenza viruses.  CDC recommends that students, faculty, and staff wash their hands often with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing.  Alcohol-based hand cleaners may also be effective.  Soap, paper towels and sanitizers are critical for proper hand hygiene and are available throughout the campus.  The number and location of waterless hand sanitizer dispensers is being reviewed and augmented with a goal toward having them at all key traffic points.

Questions or concerns about cleaning or sanitation issues related to H1N1 may be directed to controlH1N1@wesleyan.edu.

Visit: www.cdc.gov/cleanhands for more information on hand hygiene.

Respiratory etiquette

Influenza viruses are thought to spread mainly from person to person in respiratory droplets of coughs and sneezes.  This can happen when droplets from a cough or sneeze of an infected person are propelled through the air and deposited on the mouth or nose or are inhaled by people nearby.  CDC recommends:

  • covering the nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing
  • throwing the tissue in the trash after use
  • wash hands promptly after coughing or sneezing
  • if a tissue is not immediately available, coughing or sneezing into one’s arm or sleeve (not into one’s hand) is recommended

Visit www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/covercough.htm for more information on respiratory etiquette.

Routine cleaning

CDC recommends frequent cleaning of bathrooms and other frequently used areas, and provision of adequate supplies of soap and paper towels.  We have reviewed and adjusted campus cleaning schedules in accordance with these recommendations.  These recommendations have been reviewed in detail with Physical Plant and appropriate training and supplies are being provided to housekeeping staff.  Students living together should regularly clean frequently used surfaces such as doorknobs, refrigerator handles, remote controls, computer keyboards, countertops, faucet handles, and bathroom areas.

Self isolation

If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.) Keep away from others as much as possible to keep from making others sick.

Is there a vaccine against H1N1?

There is no vaccine available right now to protect against the 2009 H1N1 flu virus.  A vaccine is currently in production, and initial doses of this vaccine are expected to become available for the public later in the fall.  CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recommended that certain groups of the population receive the 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine when it first becomes available.

These initial target groups include pregnant women, people who live with or care for children younger than 6 months of age, healthcare and emergency medical services personnel, people age 6 months through 24 years, and people age 25 through 64 years who have underlying medical conditions that put them at higher risk of complications from influenza.  Most college students are included in these initial target groups and should be among the first to receive the 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine.  We are working closely with state and local public health officials to develop a vaccine implementation plan.  We will update the community when this planning is completed.

What do you recommend about the regular flu vaccine?

We highly recommend students, faculty and staff younger than 30 obtain a regular flu vaccine as soon as possible.  We recommend that students, faculty and staff older than 30 wait and get the usual seasonal flu vaccine in mid-late October.  This is because younger people generate a more enthusiastic, longer lasting immune response and would maintain immunity all the way through to March even if they get the flu shot now.

As in previous years, we have scheduled large-scale vaccine clinics on campus. In keeping with the above recommendations, we have shifted the dates earlier this year as follows:

  • Monday, September 21 from 12:00pm to 4:00pm
  • Wednesday, September 23 from 12:00pm to 4:00pm
  • Tuesday, October 13 from 4:00pm to 7:00pm
  • Saturday, October 17 from 10:00am to 1:00pm (faculty, staff and dependents only)

All clinics will be held in 108 Usdan.  The Visiting Nurse Association will bring at least 500 doses per clinic which is about 1,300 more doses than we have used in past years.   The cost to students will remain at $37 (no increase from last year) and faculty and staff that are Cigna eligible will get it for free as a benefit.

As a student, what do I do if I become sick while at school?

CDC recommends that individuals with influenza-like illness remain at home and away from other people until at least 24 hours after they are free of fever (100° F [37.8° C] or greater), or signs of a fever, without the use of fever-reducing medications.  Because we wish to limit transmission, we highly recommend that students leave campus if they develop a flu-like illness or stay off campus until they recover if they become ill while off-campus.  To this end, we recommend that students attempt to develop a plan to temporarily relocate to a local private home.  Ideally, students would get to this location by means other than public transportation.

Students who are unable to leave campus should remain in their own rooms and receive care and meals from a single person, if possible.  Some rooms are not conducive to self-isolation, particularly ones with common bathrooms shared by many other students.  We do have a plan to temporarily relocate some ill students to more appropriate housing, if this becomes necessary.  Ill students should limit their contact with others and, to the extent possible, maintain a distance of 6 feet from people with whom they share living space.  Students should identify a “flu buddy”, a designated caregiver if one or the other becomes ill.

Students with flu-like illness should notify their family and their Class Dean.  We encourage students to call the Davison Health Center flu line (860) 685-2653 Monday-Friday 9:00am to 4:00pm and the 24-hour line (860) 685-2470 at other times to discuss their illness, if appropriate, and especially if symptoms are severe or if they need to discuss relocation.  We strongly recommend that students call to discuss whether or not they are ready to discontinue self isolation.  We strongly encourage students with flu-like illness who feel they need medical care to call DHC or their other health care provider rather than arriving as a walk-in so as to limit spread to others.

Visit www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/guidance_homecare.htm for more information on caring for sick people in the home.

As a member of the faculty or staff, what do I do if I become sick?

CDC recommends that individuals with influenza-like illness remain at home and away from other people until at least 24 hours after they are free of fever (100° F [37.8° C] or greater), or signs of a fever, without the use of fever-reducing medications.  Because we wish to limit transmission, we highly recommend that faculty and staff leave campus if they develop a flu-like illness or stay off campus until they recover if they become ill while off-campus.  Normal sick leave policies apply.

Faculty or staff that go or stay home due to flu-like illness should notify their direct supervisor and health care provider, preferably by telephone or email.  Questions for Human Resources may be directed to jhicks@wesleyan.edu or pmelley@wesleyan.edu.

Visit www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/guidance_homecare.htm for more information on caring for sick people in the home.

What is the role of antiviral medications (Tamiflu)?

Current recommendations are to reserve these medications for those at high risk of complications of H1N1 as defined above.  Local availability of these medications may be limited.

What do I do if I am a close contact of someone who gets ill?

If close contact cannot be avoided, the person who is sick should wear a surgical mask during the period of contact.  A stock of such masks is being purchased and a distribution plan is in development.  Close contact, for the purposes of this document, is defined as having cared for or lived with a person with influenza-like illness or having been in a setting where there was a high likelihood of contact with respiratory droplets and/or body fluids of such a person.  Examples of close contact include kissing, sharing eating or drinking utensils, or having any other contact between people likely to result in exposure to respiratory droplets.  Close contact typically does not include activities such as walking by an infected person or sitting across from a symptomatic patient in a waiting room or office.

Current treatment recommendations do not include treatment for close contacts.  Those who have been close contacts of someone with influenza-like illness should monitor themselves for symptoms.  In the event symptoms develop, they should follow the above advice.

How long do we expect there to be special concern about H1N1?

After a novel influenza virus such as H1N1 passes through the population several times, sufficient community immunity develops that it begins to act more like a seasonal influenza.  This is the predicted course of events for this virus subtype.  However, it is still early in this pandemic and uncertainties remain.

Who should I contact if I have additional questions?

Joyce Walter, Director, Davison Health Center  jwalter@wesleyan.edu

Davis Smith, Medical Director, Davison Health Center  pdsmith@wesleyan.edu

thermometerDavison Health Center Flu Advice Nurse Line

Call direct
860.685.2653
Mon-Fri  9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
(After hours phone 860.685.2470)

In order to minimize infection to others, please call the Health Center FIRST if you have flu symptoms.

If your flu symptoms include shortness of breath, chest pain or pressure, rapid respirations or other
severe symptoms, please seek medical attention promptly by calling 860-685-2470.

“Call First……Save Time”

As part of emergency planning, before coming to campus, you should discuss with your families where you will go in the event the campus needs to be evacuated, and how you will get there. Please be sure your belongings are insured through your parents’ homeowner’s policy or through a company that provides insurance for college students. You should photocopy important documents, such as birth certificates, social security cards, and passports, and keep them in a separate location from the originals.

nixleThe City of Middletown Police Department has launched a new Community Information Service designed to deliver important and timely information to residents in our area using the latest technology.

This service, Nixle, delivers trustworthy and important neighborhood-level public safety and community event notifications instantly sent to you by cell phone text message, email, and web. There is NO Spam or Advertising.

Nixle is completely free (standard text message rates apply for cell phone subscribers who do not have text plans with their cell phone providers).

The service is simple to use, reliable and trusted.

Register now and learn more at www.nixle.com . Then, ask five people that you know in the community to register for the service.

Stay connected to your world, from the public safety alerts that are relevant to you, to the important neighborhood advisories you want to know about, and other valuable community information.

You decide what information you want and whether you want it sent to your cell phone, email, or just simply over the web.

For additional information, please visit the Middletown Police website or call the Police Department at 860.344.3200.

Nixle It!

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