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Category Archive for 'Majors and Programs'

You might be eligible!

The Social, Cultural, & Critical Theory Certificate (Theory Certificate) is about to finish its second year and we want to be sure everyone eligible has submitted their applications!  If you are interested in the certificate, please go to www.wesleyan.edu/theory to learn more.

Applications should be submitted to Kathleen Coe Roberts at the Center for the Humanities (95 Pearl Street) no later than June 1.  Please note that the application can be found on the Theory website and applicants should also submit a copy of their academic history which can be found on E-Portfolio.  Kathleen can be reached at kroberts@wesleyan.edu or 860/685-3044.

Graduate Liberal Studies Program Open House for Wesleyan Seniors
February 29, 2012 , 6:00pm

Usdan Campus Center, Room 110

Wesleyan seniors are invited to learn more about choosing Wesleyan for continued study through Graduate Liberal Studies. The program features small classes with beloved faculty, evening classes that allow students to also begin a career, and rolling admission for both course registration and degree candidacy.

Come and enjoy pizza from MONDO, meet with GLS admissions staff, and talk to current GLS students who started the program after their senior year at Wes.

Please RSVP to masters@wesleyan.edu – space is limited. Those who cannot attend the Open House are always welcome to make an appointment and stop by our office at 74 Wyllys Avenue to get more information.

Today a new link appears in connection with your Major Certification Form that will allow you to submit the form to your department/program major for final certification.  This is an important part of your graduation clearance.  The deadline for submission of your Major Certification Form for final certification is Thursday, February 23, 2012 at 5:00pm.  (Note: CSS, COL, and UNIV majors will not be using this electronic form.)

Go to your Wesleyan Career bucket in portfolio now and click on the Major Certification Form link.  You will see a separate link for each of your majors.  You must submit the form for each major separately.  You will be able to submit the form for final certification even if you have courses in progress that are required to fulfill the major.

You can view detailed instructions on how to submit the form at https://wesfiles.wesleyan.edu/departments/Reg/MajorCertificationForm/Public/Senior_Certification_Submission_Instructions.docx

If you have any questions, please contact Susan Krajewski at x2738, or at skrajewski@wesleyan.edu.

Monday, February 21, 12:00 noon
Usdan 108

Join Barry Chernoff, Director from the College of the Environment, as he discusses the Environmental Studies Program, encompassing the linked major, think tank and the certificate program. A pizza lunch will be served. Please RSVP by Feb 16 in order to place your order. For more information, please contact Valerie Marinelli at vmarinelli@wesleyan.edu or 860-685-3733.

The following departments will be hosting Major Declaration Open Houses 2/22 – 2/25.  For more information about the major declaration process, check out the Major Declaration website at http://www.wesleyan.edu/deans/major_declaration/.

  • Monday, February 22
    • Anthropology
      4:15-5:30 p.m.
      Anthropology Department, Anth 6 Classroom
      281 High Street
      Light refreshments
    • French Studies
      4:15-6:15 p.m.
    • RL&L Common Room
      300 High Street
      Snacks and refreshments
    • Iberian Studies
      4:15-6:15 p.m.
      RL&L Common Room
      300 High Street
      Snacks and refreshments
    • Italian Studies
      4:15-6:15 p.m.
      RL&L Common Room
      300 High Street
      Snacks and refreshments
    • Spanish
      4:15-6:15 p.m.
      RL&L Common Room
      300 High Street
      Snacks and refreshments
  • Tuesday, February 23
    • Studio Art
      4:30-5:30 p.m.
      Zilkha Gallery, Room 202
      Refreshments
    • Classical Studies
      12:00-1:00 p.m.
      Downey House Lounge, Room 200
      294 High Street
      Pizza Lunch
    • History
      12:00-1:00 p.m.
      CSS Lounge, 4th Floor PAC
      Lunch and Refreshments
    • Latin American Studies
      12:00-1:00 p.m.
      Center for the Americas, Rooms 1 and 2
      255 High Street
      Lunch
    • Philosophy
      12:00-1:00 p.m.
      Allbritton 311
      Sandwiches/Drinks
  • Wednesday, February 24
  • Thursday, February 25

The following departments will be hosting Major Declaration Open Houses 2/16 – 2/18.  For more information about the major declaration process, check out the Major Declaration website at http://www.wesleyan.edu/deans/major_declaration/.

The following departments will be hosting Major Declaration Open Houses this week:

  • Chemistry
    Wednesday, Feb. 10, 12:00-1:00 p.m.

    Woodhead Lounge
    Exley Science Center
    Lunch
  • East Asian Studies
    Thursday, Feb. 11, 4:30 p.m.

    Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies
    343 Washington Terrace
    Asian Buffet
  • English
    Thursday, Feb. 11, 4:15-6:00 p.m.

    Russell House
    Groovy Treats

For more information about the major declaration process, check out the Major Declaration website at http://www.wesleyan.edu/deans/major_declaration/

Department Chair Date Location
African American Studies (AFAM) Ashraf Rushdy Wednesday, Feb. 24
4:15-5:30 p.m.
Pizza
CAAS Lounge
343 High Street
American Studies (AMST) Patricia Hill Thursday, Feb. 25
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Center for the Americas
Rooms 1 and 2
255 High Street
Anthropology (ANTH) Elizabeth Traube Monday, Feb. 22
4:15-5:30 p.m.
Light Refreshments
Anthropology Department
Anth 6 Classroom
281 High Street
Archaeology (ARCP) Douglas Charles Thursday, Feb. 18
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Downey House Lounge
Room 200
294 High Street
Art History (ARHA) Elizabeth Milroy Thursday, Feb. 25
4:30-5:30 p.m.
Refreshments
Davison Art Center
Dining Room
Art Studio (ARST) Tula Telfair Tuesday, Feb. 23
4:30 p.m.
Refreshments
Zilkha Gallery
Room 202
Astronomy (ASTR) Ed Moran No Open House Scheduled
Biology (BIOL) Sonia Sultan Wednesday, Feb. 24
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza and Salad Lunch
Exley Science Center
Woodhead Lounge
Chemistry (CHEM) Joseph Knee Wednesday, Feb. 10
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Exley Science Center
Woodhead Lounge
Classical Studies (CCIV) Michael Roberts Tuesday, Feb. 23
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Downey House Lounge
Room 200
294 High Street
Computer Science (COMP) Karen Collins Thursday, Feb. 25
12:05-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Exley Science Center
Rm 601
Math Lounge
Environmental Studies Barry Chernoff Tuesday, Feb. 16
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Usdan 108
Dance (DANC) Nicole Stanton Wednesday, Feb. 24
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Refreshments
Dance and Theater Building
Jones Room
Earth & Environmental Studies (E&ES) Peter Patton No Open House Scheduled
East Asian Studies (EAST) Vera Schwarcz Thursday, Feb. 11
4:30 p.m.
Asian Buffet
Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies
343 Washington Terrace
Economics (ECON)
Math-Econ (MECO)
Gil Skillman Tuesday, Feb. 16
12:15-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
CSS Lounge
4th Floor PAC
English (ENGL) Joel Pfister Thursday, Feb. 11
4:15-6:00 p.m.
Groovy Treats
Russell House
Feminist, Gender & Sexuality Studies (FGSS) Natasha Korda Thursday, Feb. 18
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Allbritton 311
Film Studies (FILM) Jeanine Basinger No Open House Scheduled
German Studies (GRST) Leo Lensing Wednesday, Feb. 17
4:30 p.m.
Refreshments
Fisk 404
Government (GOVT) John Finn No Open House Scheduled
History (HIST) William Pinch Tuesday, Feb. 23
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch and Refreshments
CSS Lounge
4th Floor PAC
Latin American Studies (LAST) Ann Wightman Tuesday, Feb. 23
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Center for the Americas
Rooms 1 and 2
255 High Street
Mathematics (MATH) Karen Collins Thursday, Feb. 25
12:00-12:50 p.m.
Lunch
Exley Science Center
Rm 601
Math Lounge
Medieval Studies (MDST) Jeff Rider Wednesday, Feb. 17
4:14-5:15 p.m.
Center for Humanities 206
Molecular Biology & Biochemistry (MB&B) Michael McAlear Thursday, Feb. 25
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Exley Science Center
Woodhead Lounge
Music (MUSC) Su Zheng Wednesday, Feb. 17
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
World Music Hall
Neuroscience and Behavior (NS&B) John Kirn Wednesday, Feb. 17
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Exley Science Center
Woodhead Lounge
Philosophy (PHIL) Stephen Angle Tuesday, Feb. 23
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Sandwiches/Drinks
Allbritton 311
Physics (PHYS) Reinhold Blumel Tuesday, Feb. 16
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
255 Exley Science Center
Physics Cady Lounge
Psychology (PSYC) Lisa Dierker No Open House Scheduled
Religion (RELI) Peter Gottschalk Tuesday, Feb. 16
4:15-6:00 p.m.
Refreshments
Religious Studies Seminar Room
171 Church Street
Romance Languages & Literatures
French Studies (FRST)
Italian Studies (ITAL)
Romance Studies
Spanish (SPAN)
Iberian Studies (IBST)
Catherine Poisson Monday, Feb. 22
4:15-6:15 p.m.
Snacks & Refreshments
RL&L Common Room
300 High Street
Russian & East European Studies (REES)
Russian Language & Literature (RUSS)
Susanne Fusso Wednesday, Feb. 24
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Fisk Hall
Room 215
Science in Society (SISP) Joseph Rouse Thursday, Feb. 25
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Allbritton 311
Sociology (SOC) Jonathan Cutler Thursday, Feb. 25
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
PAC 107
Theater (THEA) John Carr Thursday, Feb. 18
4:15-6:00 p.m.
Refreshments
Theater & Dance Studios
East Room

Wesleyan students must declare a major during the second semester of the sophomore year.  As a member of the Class of 2012, this means that you must declare a major–and have it approved by department or interdisciplinary program into which you are seeking admission–by Friday, March 5.  Once you have been admitted to a major, you will receive major preference for courses in your department or program when course Pre-Registration takes place in April.  Please be aware that each department has its own processes and procedures for admitting students into its major program, so it is important that you consult with an advising expert in your intended department before you initiate the major declaration process.

In any case, you are strongly encouraged to undertake the following before making any final decisions about what to major in:

Once you have decided which major you will be applying for, you must login to your e-portfolio to officially begin the major declaration process.  In your student portfolio, navigate to the “Wesleyan Career” bucket and click on the “Major Declaration” link.  In the dropdown menu that appears on the next page, select the department you have decided to apply to and click the “Submit Major” button.  Clicking the “Submit Major” button sends a message to the department with your request to declare the major; an automated email message to you will then confirm that your request has been received. Clicking on the submit button also provides the department with access to your academic history.  Depending on the major you are declaring, it is possible that the department may require you to submit additional information or meet with a member of the department.  If the department approves your request to join the major, this approval will noted on the “Major Declaration” page in your portfolio (the same page from which you initiated the declaration process).  If you are declaring a second major, simply repeat this process.

An important feature of the major declaration process is the Pre-Major Advising Survey.  After submitting your major declaration request, you will be prompted to submit feedback regarding your advising experiences over the past three semesters.  Your answers will be kept confidential and will be made available to your former advisor at the beginning of the summer as a tool to improve his or her advising.  You must complete the Pre-Major Advising Survey before your major declaration request to be forwarded to the department for review.

Individual departments and programs have different procedures for assigning advisors to students.  For this reason, once you have been accepted into your major it is important that you contact the department chair to initiate the process of finding an advisor.  Your major advisor will work with you through Course Pre-Registration in April and will help you design your program of study over the next four semesters.

If you are unable to declare your major by the Friday, March 5 deadline because, for example, you are currently completing a prerequisite course, you must submit a Major Deferral form to me so that I will know that you are still in the process of gaining entry into a major.  You will be required to communicate your plans with the chair of your intended department or program.  You must also identify an alternate major in case you are not accepted into your first choice.

If you have any questions or concerns about the major declaration process, or if you are feeling anxious or unsure about meeting the major declaration deadline, please contact me as soon as possible at dphillips@wesleyan.edu or 860.685.2757.  Please keep in mind that while choosing a major is a milestone in your college career, it is not a decision that will affect all aspects of your future in a profound or irreversible way.  That may sound like heresy, but it is true.  This is not to say that your major is irrelevant or insignificant, but it is important to know that there are many myths surrounding one’s choice of a major.  These myths–for example, that only certain majors lead to certain careers–can be the source of a lot of unnecessary anxiety and stress and I would be happy to dispel them for you.

Best wishes for a successful semester!

David Phillips
Dean for the Class of 2012

englishCan the study of literature not only give you pleasure, but equip you to make visible and question the givens, the language, the form, and the history that have shaped the way we read ourselves and our world? And is this ability valuable? Of course!

Come hear about what English alums have done, are doing, and can do!  Featuring:

  • Ariel levy ’96, book author and staff writer for The New Yorker; recently interviewed on the Colbert report (we will show this exciting clip).
  • Sophie Pollitt-Cohen ’09, book author and independent writer (The Huffington Post, The New York Times Book Review, and other publications).
  • Amy Tang, Assistant Professor of English and American Studies and Harvard University English major ’94, who worked in several different and fascinating fields before switching gears and earning her Phd from stanford ’09.
  • Jim Kubat, Associate Director for Career Development and Pre-Law advisor, who will distribute eye-opening statistics and information on what English majors have actually done over the years and can do.

Introduced and moderated by

  • Joel Pfister, Chair, Department of English, and Kenan Professor of the Humanities

A reception with groovy treats after the panel

Thursday, December 10, 2009, 4:15 p.m.
Downey House 113

Sponsored by the English Majors Committee and the English Department

The international system is increasingly characterized by neotrusteeship relations that link great powers to the periphery through formal and informal transfers of political authority and institutions. In contemporary Iraq, the United States has supplied a battery of “parallel institutions” that link American political authority and operational mandates to public goods provision in sectors such as security, infrastructure, and regulation. We know very little about the origins, efficiency, and implications of these institutions for state power. I argue that the US has employed parallel institutions in Iraq for the sake of short-term security and infrastructure, which would not be possible in the current political environment. However, parallel institutions are inefficient providers of public goods due to principal-agent problems , as well as their lack of accountability to local populations. Finally, parallel institutions will only weaken the Iraqi state after American withdrawal, as they provide disincentives for local political and administrative reforms that could undergird purely Iraqi public goods provision.

Friday, December 11
12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m.
Cafe on the top floor of the Allbritton Center

Chenoweth’s research program involves three general questions: why do
non-state groups use political violence, what are the alternatives to political violence, and how can states best combat non-state political violence? Currently, Chenoweth is investigating the conditions under which nonviolent resistance methods are more effective than violent methods in achieving strategic goals such as regime change, expelling foreign occupiers, or achieving self-determination. She is also working on a project that assesses the efficacy of counterterrorism in the Middle East since in1980, and in another she is looking at how the tactical evolutions of nonviolent and violent insurgencies have affected their strategic outcomes.

Friday, December 4
12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m.
Cafe on the top floor of the Allbritton Center

The Psychology Department is holding a Study Abroad Panel for prospective psychology majors. Psychology majors who have gone abroad share their experiences with students interested in majoring in psychology to learn about study abroad from the perspective of a psychology major. They will talk about what experiences/programs worked well in their opinion and why, as well as any advice they wish to pass along to others about study abroad.
The panel will be Wednesday, December 2, 4:15 – 5:15 p.m., in Judd Hall Rm. 116, and pizza will be served.

Tonight English comes to Fauver (the newest building on Foss Hill, behind Westco and by the observatory).  Professor Joel Pfister, Professor Matt Garrett, Professor Joe Drury and two talented alums of English 201 (the seminar gateway to the major) are going to say a few words about why literary studies and English 201 rock in Fauver, 7:00-8:30.  We hope that all sophomores and frosh even considering the possibility of majoring in English and taking English 201 will come.  Treats will be served!

While it is often asserted that leaders use foreign policy to domestic advantage as elections approach, the scholarly findings on this subject defy simple characterization. My project examines the extent to which U.S. presidents adjust their foreign policies during an election run. I contend that while elections do affect foreign policy decisions, presidents do not seek political advantage from foreign policy and instead see foreign policy only as a potential threat to their political objectives.

Friday, November 20
12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m.
Butt C Lounge

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