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Category Archive for 'Grants & Fellowships'

The College of the Environment internships allow students to undertake research on environmental topics under the guidance of a faculty mentor during the Summer or Fall, 2011. The scope of environmental topics is meant in the broad sense and the research may be undertaken using techniques, approaches and paradigms from all majors or major programs. Internships are available to Wesleyan Students across the entire University.

The summer internship will run from May 25, 2011 – July 29, 2011, while the Fall 2011 internship would run the term of the semester. Internships carry a stipend of $4,000.

The deadline for applications is due on or before Monday, February 21, 2011, allowing us to announce internship candidates by Friday, March 4th, prior to spring break. Student applications are to be delivered to Ms. Valerie Marinelli, Administrative Assistant, College of the Environment, 284 High Street.  Click here to download an application.

The student application also requires two short letters of recommendation from Wesleyan faculty. In addition to recommending the student, the faculty mentor must briefly (1-2 paragraphs) explain the project, its importance and relevance to her/his research program. Letters of recommendation may either be sent to Ms. Marinelli through campus mail or by email (pdf preferred) to vmarinelli@wesleyan.edu.

To get the application, please stop by the College of the Environment, 284 High Street or check with any Administrative Assistant on campus who has received the email.

The applications, including statements by faculty, will be judged by the oversight and awards committee.

For further information, please contact Valerie Marinelli at (860) 685-3733.

Limited funds are available to support student research and other student scholarly projects in public affairs to begin this summer.  Only current sophomores and juniors are eligible.  These funds are made available through a gift to Wesleyan University from the Surdna Foundation in honor of Frederick Morgan Davenport, Wesleyan University Class of 1889, and Edith Jefferson Andrus Davenport, Wesleyan University, Class of 1897.

In past years, Davenport Scholarships have been awarded to sophomores and juniors who have “demonstrated intellectual and moral excellence and a concern for public affairs” and “who by their personal qualities and vocational and scholarly intentions give greatest promise of leadership in the public service.”  It is expected that most of the grants will be concentrated in the social science departments and the CSS, but applications will be accepted from majors in all areas of the University as long as the proposed projects are related to public affairs.

Applications must contain: (1) a title, (2) a brief description of the proposed project, its objectives and its significance, including a discussion of the relevant scholarly literature; (3) a statement discussing course work relating to the proposed project; (4) an account of the methods for carrying it out; (5) a timetable for completion [a project may continue through the academic year 2009-2010]; (6) a detailed budget; (7) a copy of the student’s transcript [which you may copy from your portfolio if you wish], CSS students please include your comprehensive Examination grade, and (8) a letter from the faculty member who will supervise the project, carefully assessing its merit and the ability of the applicant to carry it out successfully.  Applications are not to exceed five double-spaced pages (not counting the supervisor’s letter or transcript) and must be electronically submitted AS AN ATTACHMENT. (See below.)  It is the applicant’s responsibility to inform his or her faculty supervisor to submit a letter electronically AS AN ATTACHMENT. Both the application and the faculty member’s letter must contain the student’s name (with the last name listed first) followed by “Davenport Proposal” in the subject line.

Funds are limited, and we expect competition for the awards to be keen. The committee will examine each proposal closely, with special attention to the scholarly value of the proposed research, the feasibility of the project, and the reasonableness of the proposed budget.  Students should make their proposals as specific and detailed as possible, and support them with evidence of their ability to complete the work according to a realistic schedule.  They should prepare the budget with special care, including only essential expenses and showing precisely how the proposed budget supports the work being proposed. Your budget cannot include the purchase of capital equipment (i.e., digital recorders, cameras, etc.). Those planning to do research abroad should consult with Carolyn Sorkin in the Office of International Studies about their plans and budgets.

For guidance on writing a successful grant proposal, please consult “The Art of Writing Proposals” on the Social Sciences Research Council website. http://www.ssrc.org/publications/view/7A9CB4F4-815F-DE11-BD80-001CC477EC70/ Students may also consider contacting last year’s Davenport grant recipients listed on the PAC Prize website to request copies of their proposals and tips on writing an effective proposal. http://www.wesleyan.edu/pac/Past_Winners.html

Please note that research proposals involving living human subjects who could be individually identified (unless in public office), audio or video recordings of participants, sensitive data, vulnerable populations, or the observation of behavioral tasks in a laboratory will require IRB approval; please see http://www.wesleyan.edu/acaf/Institutional_Review_Board.html for additional information.

All Davenport Scholars will receive a minimum of $500, as stipulated by the terms of the Davenport Bequest.  Additional amounts of up to $2500 may be awarded, the amount depending on the availability of funds and project needs.  Total awards will generally be limited to $3000, but successful applicants can apply for modest supplements if, during their projects, it appears that the $3000 limit is too restrictive.  An interim report, 3-5 pages in length, is to be submitted in September. This report should describe the work done with the grant money over the course of the summer and how this work will advance the student’s thesis or other honors projects during the coming year. Upon completion of the project, each Davenport Scholar must submit a brief report to the Committee on his/her activities, accomplishments, and an accounting of expenditures beyond $500.

Applications will be judged by a faculty committee composed of representatives of the five Public Affairs Center departments.  Criteria for judging applications include: the relevance of the project to public affairs; the clarity and suitability of the project design; the feasibility of the proposed project; the applicant’s past academic record; the evaluation submitted by the faculty member; and the realism of the proposed budget.  Senior thesis projects will receive priority.

All materials including faculty recommendations must be submitted electronically to Davenport grant (davenport@wesleyan.edu), by noon, Friday, March 11, 2011.  On the top of the first page, please include your WES I.D., Wesleyan Box No., email address, name of faculty advisor who will be submitting a recommendation (if your thesis advisor will be someone else, that person should also be listed here), as well as your citizenship for tax purposes.  Announcement of grant awards will be made on or before April 4, 2011. Titles of successful applications will also be posted on the PAC website, www.wesleyan.edu/pac.

The Peter Morgenstern-Clarren ’03 Social Justice Award was created in memory of Peter Morgenstern-Clarren, who pursued social justice as a student at Wesleyan.  His activism included securing benefits for Wesleyan custodial staff, participating in the United Student and Labor Action Coalition, and contributing his leadership to the campus chapter of Amnesty International.  We are grateful to Dr. Hadley Morgenstern-Clarren and The Honorable Pat Morgenstern-Clarren for their generosity in sponsoring this award that honors their son’s activism for the public good.

The committee will select the applicant who best embodies the pursuit of social justice. Sophomores and juniors in good standing are encouraged to apply.

To apply, please submit an essay that addresses the following:

  • Describe in detail the most influential social justice effort in which you have played a leadership role that sought to make our local and/or global community more equitable. The work should directly affect the Wesleyan campus and/or an external community.
  • Explain your role in raising awareness about a particular issue on campus, coordinating events, implementing programming and campaigns, etc., in the pursuit of social justice.
  • While local efforts central to the Wesleyan campus are weighted equally with external efforts at home, on a national, or international level, students who have managed to link their local activism with a larger community are especially encouraged to apply.  Please describe, in detail, how you have sought to synthesize local and external efforts.

Additional materials:

  • Include a letter of support from a faculty member, administrator who was involved in your social justice effort or other person(s) (excluding family and close friends) with firsthand knowledge of your social justice activities
  • Submit evidence of the impact that the effort had on its target community by contributing testimonies from individuals directly involved or who benefited (excluding family and close friends), printed programs/presentations/articles, non-print materials such as DVDs, and/or your work from courses.

Provide at least four copies of your application materials (print and non-print) to Dean Marina J Melendez (North College, 2nd floor, Room 215) by 5pm on February 28, 2011. By submitting your packet, you agree to allow the Office of Student Affairs and the Office of Diversity and Institutional Partnerships to use it for assessment, archival, and promotional purposes.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact Dean Marina J Melendez, Ph.D., x.2765, mmelendez@wesleyan.edu.

If you are looking for a productive and financially rewarding way to spend your summer, the Northwestern University Summer Research Opportunity Program (SROP) may be what you are looking for.

What is the SROP?
Throughout its 25-year history, the mission of the SROP has been to increase diversity among students pursuing graduate education and to provide a valuable academic research experience for students. The program is eight weeks in length, from June 20 through August 13, 2011, and includes faculty-supervised research, enrichment activities that prepare undergraduates for graduate school, a research conference and social activities.

Who can apply?
Current sophomores and juniors with a cumulative GPA of 3.3 or higher are eligible to apply. Students from groups traditionally underrepresented in graduate schools (African-Americans, Hispanics, & Native-Americans) are encouraged to apply. Please note that students interested in pursuing an MBA, JD, or MD are not eligible for this program.

Funding
Each SROP participant will receive a stipend of $4000 and research supply funds of $500. Northwestern will also provide complimentary campus housing and a $450 campus meal subsidy, in addition to covering round trip travel expenses for all SROP participants who will be traveling to Northwestern from outside of the Evanston/Chicago area

Application Deadline
The application deadline is February 1, 2011.

For more information and to access the on-line application, please visit the following web site:

http://www.tgs.northwestern.edu/studentlife/multiculturaloffice/research/srop/

The New York Times is inviting readers to submit entries to the fifth annual “Win a Trip with Nick” contest.

Through this contest, Op Ed-columnist and Pulitzer Prize winner Nicholas D. Kristof hopes to increase awareness and understanding about the many complex issues and opportunities for the developing world. This year, Mr. Kristof will choose two winners – one currently-enrolled college or graduate student and one adult over the age of 60 – to accompany him on a reporting trip. To be considered for the contest, applicants are invited to submit either a written essay or a video entry that articulates their desire to accompany Mr. Kristof on a reporting trip and explains why they are an ideal candidate for such an experience.

Essay submissions are limited to 700 words and should be send to WinATrip@nytimes.com. Video submissions must be under three minutes and should be posted on Mr. Kristof’s YouTube channel www.youtube.com/nicholaskristof.  Submissions must be received by January 18, 2011, and students must be 18 or older to be eligible for the contest.

For additional details on Win a Trip, please go to Nick’s Blog – On the Ground, nytimes.com/ontheground.

The Peter Morgenstern-Clarren ’03 Social Justice Award was created in memory of Peter Morgenstern-Clarren, who pursued social justice as a student at Wesleyan.  His activism included securing benefits for Wesleyan custodial staff, participating in the United Student and Labor Action Coalition, and contributing his leadership to the campus chapter of Amnesty International.  We are grateful to Dr. Hadley Morgenstern-Clarren and The Honorable Pat Morgenstern-Clarren for their generosity in sponsoring this award that honors their son’s activism for the public good.

The committee will select the applicant who best embodies the pursuit of social justice. Sophomores and juniors in good standing are encouraged to apply.

To apply, please submit an essay that addresses the following:

  • Describe in detail the most influential social justice effort in which you have played a leadership role that sought to make our local and/or global community more equitable. The work should directly affect the Wesleyan campus and/or an external community.
  • Explain your role in raising awareness about a particular issue on campus, coordinating events, implementing programming and campaigns, etc., in the pursuit of social justice.
  • While local efforts central to the Wesleyan campus are weighted equally with external efforts at home, on a national, or international level, students who have managed to link their local activism with a larger community are especially encouraged to apply.  Please describe, in detail, how you have sought to synthesize local and external efforts.

Additional materials:

  • Include a letter of support from a faculty member, administrator who was involved in your social justice effort or other person(s) (excluding family and close friends) with firsthand knowledge of your social justice activities
  • Submit evidence of the impact that the effort had on its target community by contributing testimonies from individuals directly involved or who benefited (excluding family and close friends), printed programs/presentations/articles, non-print materials such as DVDs, and/or your work from courses.

Provide at least four copies of your application materials (print and non-print) to Dean Marina J Melendez (North College, 2nd floor, Room 215) by 5pm on February 28, 2011. By submitting your packet, you agree to allow the Office of Student Affairs and the Office of Diversity and Institutional Partnerships to use it for assessment, archival, and promotional purposes.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact Dean Marina J Melendez, Ph.D., x.2765, mmelendez@wesleyan.edu.

Learn how to apply:

Tuesday Dec 7 at noon in Usdan 108
or
Wednesday Dec 8 at 4pm in Usdan 108

More info:

www.wesleyan.edu/ocs/peace.htt or clechowicz@wesleyan.edu

Learn how to apply:
Tuesday Dec 7 at noon in Usdan 108
or
Wednesday Dec 8 at 4pm in Usdan 108
More info:
www.wesleyan.edu/ocs/peace.htt  or clechowicz@wesleyan.edu

Last weekend, several Wesleyan students, including Raghu Appasani,  Yinka Taiwo-Peters, Tasmiha Khan, Bonnie Quach-Wong, Stephanie Tapia, Lindsey Kenney, Youngbin Lee, and Rajeeta Iyer (all members of the Class of 2012) attended the DoSomething.com Boot Camp for young social entrepreneurs.

The New York Times covered the conference in an article entitled “Young Activists Practices Their Pitches for Nonprofits,” (Nov. 10, 2010). 

Want $25,000 to travel around the world doing a self-designed project based on your passion for one year after you graduate?

Attention Juniors!

Going abroad/on leave this spring and interested in applying for the Watson Fellowship in September 2011?

Come to the Watson Informational Meeting with Dean Brown.

Wednesday, November 18, 12:15 p.m.
Usdan 110 (Andersen Meeting Room)

Proposals for the Class of 2012 due mid-September 2011.

For more info about the fellowship, see www.watsonfellowship.org and www.wesleyan.edu/deans/watson.html.

Learn how to apply for the 100 Projects for Peace grant:

  • Tuesday, Nov 16 at 4pm in Usdan 108
  • Wednesday, Nov 17 at noon in Usdan 108
  • Wednesday, Nov 17 at 8pm in Usdan 110

More info:

www.wesleyan.edu/ocs/peace.htt or clechowicz@wesleyan.edu

Udall Scholarship

In 2011, the Foundation expects to award 80 scholarships of up to $5000 and 50 honorable mentions of $350 to sophomore and junior level college students committed to careers related to the environment, tribal public policy, or Native American health care.

Scholarships are offered in any of three categories:

  • To students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to the environment; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to tribal public policy; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to Native health care.

The Udall Foundation seeks future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, and economics.

The Udall Foundation seeks future Native American and Alaska Native leaders in Native American health care and tribal public policy. Tribal policy includes fields related to tribal sovereignty, tribal governance, tribal law, Native American education, Native American justice, natural resource management, cultural preservation and revitalization, Native American economic development, and other areas affecting Native American communities. Native American health care includes health care administration, social work, medicine, and research into health conditions affecting Native American communities.

More information is available at  www.udall.gov.  Contact David Phillips, Dean for the Class of 2012 (dphillips@wesleyan.edu, x2757) if you are interested in applying.

This summer, Yinka Taiwo-Peters ’12 started and ran “The Water Awareness Project” in Abuja, Nigeria, with the aid of the Rausch Internship grant from the Environmental Studies Department. There is a growing water crisis in Nigeria with a large proportion of the population having no access to safe drinking water. It is estimated that only half of the 140 million people have access to safe water, and even fewer to basic sanitation facilities.

The goal of Water Awareness Project was to create awareness among Nigerian youths on the role of water in practicing good sanitation habits, while emphasizing water conservation practices. In June, Yinka gave 30-minute to 60-minute talks on the role of water in sanitation and water conservation practices in twenty-schools in Central Abuja. In July, she worked with the pupils of an Abro Hallmark International School, located in Mpape, Abuja, a settlement deficient of portable water. With the help of a plumber, the pupils and Yinka installed a water tank that employs a rainwater harvesting system from the rooftop of a school building. This particular activity emphasized the importance of community engagement from one’s younger years and showed a water conservation practice. With the tank installation, it is hoped that the students will spend less time in search of water before classes and medical costs will be reduced as a result of water-related diseases contracted from the use of contaminated water.

At the end of July, Yinka concluded the water awareness project and conducted mini surveys from the students in participating schools. In the future, she plans to continue this project by expanding to more rural settlements and schools in other parts of Nigeria.

Congratulations to the following members of the Class of 2012 who are among this year’s recipients of Academic Scholarships, Fellowships and Prizes:

Blankenagel Prize

Income from the John C. Blankenagel Fund, established in 1970, awarded at the discretion of the Department of German studies to enrich educational offerings in the area of humanistic studies, or to assist a superior student in completing a project in German studies.

Matthew Alexander 2012
Katherine Wolf 2012

Bruner Freshman Improvement Prize

The gift of William Evans Bruner, Class of 1888, to the student whose second-semester first-year record shows the greatest relative improvement over that of the first semester.

Elaine Chan 2012

Condil Award

Given in memory of Caroline Condil, Class of 1992, and is awarded to a worthy East Asian Studies major, preferably a sophomore or junior, for study in China.

Marjorie Rivera 2012

Herbert Lee Connelly Prize

Given in 1980 by Mabel Wells Connelly in the name of her husband, member of the Class of 1909, and alumni secretary, 1924-56. Supplemented by friends, relatives, and sons Hugh Wells and Theodore Sample, Class of 1948, the fund provides income to be awarded annually to a deserving undergraduate who demonstrates an interest in English literature and an unusual ability in nonfiction writing.

Amanda Schwartz 2012

Susan Frazer Prize

Awarded annually to the student (or students) who has done the most distinguished work in the elementary and intermediate French language sequence.

Emma Paine 2012

James T. Gutmann Field Studies Scholarship

Established in 2007 by Lisette Cooper �81, to honor her former professor and mentor, Prof. James T. Gutmann. Awarded to an especially promising major in Earth & Environmental Sciences to support geologic field research expected to lead to a senior honors thesis.

Rebecca Snelling 2012

Peter Morgenstern-Clarren Social Justice Award

Awarded to a sophomore or junior with a demonstrated commitment to social justice issues.

Allegra Stout 2012

Olin Fellowship

Founded in 1854 by the wife of Stephen Olin, president, 1839-41 and 1842-51. Later increased by gifts of their son, Stephen Henry Olin, Class of 1866 and acting president, 1922-23, and his wife, Emeline. Awarded in recognition of achievement in English. The fellowship supports supervised work in English outside of the Wesleyan course structure.

Patrick Cline 2012
Kennedy Odede 2012
Jared Radin 2012
Andrew Zingg 2012

Parker Prize

Established in 1870 by the Reverend John Parker, Trustee 1859-71. Awarded to a sophomore or junior who excels in public speaking.

Ali Chaudhry 2012

Plukas Teaching Apprentice Award

Established in 1986 by John Plukas, Class of 1966, this prize is awarded for excellent service to the Economics Department as a teaching apprentice.

Mitchell Belkin, 2012
Jack Hoskins, 2012
Kwan Yeung (Brian) Lau, 2012
Eunju Rho, 2012
Mathew Stinson, 2012
Margaret Vasu, 2012
David Wei, 2012

Reed Prize

Established in 1968 by Leon Reed and his sons, S. Chadwick, Class of 1941, and Dr. Victor Reed, in memory of Mrs. Sophie Reed, for the best poem or group of poems.

Corey Dethier 2012
Leia Jane Zidel 2012

Robertson Prize

Awarded for excellence in mathematics to a sophomore.

Kwan Yeung (Brian) Lau 2012
Zin Lin 2012
Julia Thomsen 2012

Siver Scholarship

Established by Mr. and Mrs. Chester A. Siver in memory of their son Roger Brooks Siver, who graduated from Wesleyan in 1968. Awarded to undergraduate students majoring in or demonstrating strong academic interest in physics.

Syed Mohommad Kumail Akbar 2012
David Amrhein 2012
Thomas Kuntz 2012
Prashant Mukhopadhyay 2012
Nicholas Rotile 2012
Garrett Ruggieri 2011

Social Activist Award

Awarded to the individual or student group that best exemplifies the spirit of social activism and through his/her/their efforts, constructive social change ensued.

Joshua Levine 2012

Elizabeth Verveer Tishler Prize―Music

Established in 1981 by a gift from Mrs. Tishler. Expanded in 1989 for excellence in piano performance. Two prizes are given annually: one for Western classical piano performance and the other for jazz piano performance.

Fumi Tanakadate 2012

Watson Fellowship informational meeting

Wednesday, April 14
4:15 p.m.
PAC 001

Watson Fellow 2010-11 Liana Woskie ‘10 will talk about the fellowship and application process with Dean Brown

Be there!

The English Department and Writing Programs invite students to submit outstanding poetry, fiction, and prose for consideration for prizes.  These prizes recognize exceptional student writing and also support summer projects and graduate study.  Prize winners have included students from all majors and class years. Students have undertaken various ambitious projects through summer fellowships, including travel to Bangladesh, Kenya, and other foreign destinations. Students have also completed research, oral history projects, and personal writing initiatives.

Please see our website for a complete list of awards and complete application procedures for each at  www.wesleyan.edu/writing

Applications are due March 24th to the Writing Programs Office in Downey 112 (lower level).

For further information email Jessica Posner, Russell House Arts Fellow, 860.685.3448, RussellHouse@wesleyan.edu.

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