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Category Archive for 'Academic Programs'

You might be eligible!

The Social, Cultural, & Critical Theory Certificate (Theory Certificate) is about to finish its second year and we want to be sure everyone eligible has submitted their applications!  If you are interested in the certificate, please go to www.wesleyan.edu/theory to learn more.

Applications should be submitted to Kathleen Coe Roberts at the Center for the Humanities (95 Pearl Street) no later than June 1.  Please note that the application can be found on the Theory website and applicants should also submit a copy of their academic history which can be found on E-Portfolio.  Kathleen can be reached at kroberts@wesleyan.edu or 860/685-3044.

On Thursday, April 19, the Seventh Annual Science Theses Celebration will feature seniors and BA/MA students from the Natural Science & Mathematics departments presenting posters on their research to the Wesleyan community. Refreshments will be provided!

Where: Exley Science Center lobby

When: Thursday, April 19, from 1:30-3:00pm

Please join Wesleyan students and faculty members in celebrating the achievements of our NSM thesis students!

The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, the Center for African American Studies, the Center for the Arts, the Theater Department, the Writing Program, and Yale School of Drama have joined forces to present a week of events that highlight the art of playwriting. The series of talks, performances, and readings culminate in Wesleyan’s first conference on playwriting pedagogy and creative processes. Though the conference is closed to participants, all events are open to the public and several are free

Friday to Sunday, February 24-26
Playwriting Conference:
Contemporary Conventions, Cultural Innovations, Playful Traditions
The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life

Conference curators: Cláudia Tatinge Nascimento (Theater Department) and Ken Prestininzi (Yale School of Drama).

International guests: Brazilian playwright Newton Moreno and theater scholar Alberto Tibaji.

Participants: Migdalia Cruz (NO Passport), Erik Ehn (Brown University), Marcus Gardley (Hartford Stage, Brown University), Quiara Alegría Hudes (Wesleyan University, In the Heights), Elizabeth Jackson (Wesleyan University), Matthew Maguire (New Dramatists, Fordham University), Deb Margolin (New Dramatists, Yale University), Charlotte Meehan (Wheaton College), Frank Pugliese (Yale University), Lucy Thurber (New Dramatists, Sarah Lawrence College), Wesleyan undergraduate playwriting students and members of Captain Partridge, graduate playwriting students from Brown University and Yale School of Drama.

Events calendar:

Monday, February 20
7pm: screening of Young Jean Lee’s The Shipment, CFA Hall. FREE

“Cultural images of black America are tweaked, pulled and twisted like Silly Putty in this subversive, seriously funny new theater piece by the adventurous playwright Young Jean Lee… Ms. Lee sets you thinking about how we unconsciously process experience — at the theater, or in life — through the filter of racial perspective, and how hard it can be to see the world truly in something other than black and white.”
— Charles Isherwood, New York Times

http://youngjeanlee.org/the_shipment

Tuesday, February 21
8pm: an evening talk with Young Jean Lee, Memorial Chapel. FREE

Korean-born and Brooklyn-based playwright and director Young Jean Lee’s works deal with issues such as gender identity and race in unpredictable, inventive and humorous ways. A 2011 Guggenheim Fellow, Ms. Lee founded her own theater company in 2003, swiftly becoming one of this country’s most influential voices in experimental theater.

Thursday, February 23
8pm: An Evening of Spoken Word with Javon Johnson at Crowell Concert Hall

Spoken word/slam poet Javon Johnson merges the sharp criticism of critical race and gender theory with comedy, lyricism and hip-hop rhyme schemes to discuss the power of words, communication and performance. Mr. Johnson has appeared on HBO’s Def Poetry Jam and BET’s Lyric Cafe, and co-wrote the poetic narration for Showtime’s basketball documentary Crossover.

Friday, February 24, 8pm
Good Goods by Christina Anderson, directed by Tina Landau. Yale Repertory Theatre.

Saturday, February 25
7pm & 10pm: SPILL, co-created by Leigh Fondakowski and Reeva Wortel
Fayerweather Beckham Hall

A collaboration between writer Leigh Fondakowski (The Laramie Project, The People’s Temple, I Think I Like Girls) and visual artist Reeva Wortel (American Portrait Project), SPILL is a new play and installation that explores the true human and environmental cost of oil. SPILL is based in part on interviews with people from the Gulf Coast of southern Louisiana in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of April 2010, the largest environmental disaster in United States history.

Sunday, February 26
2pm & 7pm: SPILL, co-created by Leigh Fondakowski and Reeva Wortel
Fayerweather Beckham Hall

Graduate Liberal Studies Program Open House for Wesleyan Seniors
February 29, 2012 , 6:00pm

Usdan Campus Center, Room 110

Wesleyan seniors are invited to learn more about choosing Wesleyan for continued study through Graduate Liberal Studies. The program features small classes with beloved faculty, evening classes that allow students to also begin a career, and rolling admission for both course registration and degree candidacy.

Come and enjoy pizza from MONDO, meet with GLS admissions staff, and talk to current GLS students who started the program after their senior year at Wes.

Please RSVP to masters@wesleyan.edu – space is limited. Those who cannot attend the Open House are always welcome to make an appointment and stop by our office at 74 Wyllys Avenue to get more information.

Students are invited to a symposium called ‘Digging Together:  Community Archaeology: Practice and Potential.’ It will be held  Saturday, February 25 from 1pm to 4pm at the former Cross Street AME Zion Church (160 Cross St, just down from Neon Deli, opposite the Freeman Athletic Center). The forum will be This is being held in advance of beginning excavations on the ‘Beman Triangle’ (between Vine, Cross, and Knowles) in partnership with the Cross Street AME Zion Church this April. The project is being run as a service learning class where Wesleyan students are putting into practice the principles of shared partnerships through community archaeology as they learn about the history of the Beman Triangle and the methods of archaeology. This site is of national importance, as it was a planned mid-nineteenth century settlement of property owning African Americans. Here members of the AME Zion Church community (Middletown’s was the third such Church to form) managed to live successful lives in the face of racist oppression at a national and local level. The excavations will explore the material remains of the daily lives of these households.

At the symposium, the  three speakers will be discussing projects which work in collaboration between communities and archaeologists to engage in archaeological projects which produce exciting research outcomes, but in partnership with communities and which also engage with their own interests in specific sites.

Further details about the symposium are online, along with more details of the Beman Triangle archaeology Project: http://middletownmaterials.research.wesleyan.edu/beman-triangle/

Attention, Seniors! Unsure of what to do next year? Looking for a job with significant responsibilities and learning opportunities?  Interested in a career in teaching, writing, or the arts?

Look no further. Apply for the Wesleyan Writing Fellowships! Every year, the Writing Programs awards three graduating seniors with prestigious one-year, post-graduate fellowships:

Two Ford Fellows assist the Director of Writing Programs in running the university’s Writing Programs and Writing Workshop, including training more than one hundred student writing tutors. The position offers significant teaching and administrative experience.

The  Shapiro Center/Russell House Arts Fellow organizes and supervises the writing and music events and helps with other literary events on campus. The job offers an opportunity to work with distinguished writers, journalists, and other artists.

For more information, come to the information session this Thursday to hear Professor Anne Greene, Director of Writing Programs, speak about the program.

Current Ford Fellows Katherine  Mechling ’11 and Anya Backlund ’11, as well as current Shapiro Center/Russell House Arts Fellow Barbara Fenig ’11 will be available to speak about their experiences and answer questions.

If you are unable to attend but are interested in the Fellowships, contact russellhouse(at)wesleyan(dot)edu or writingworks(at)wesleyan(dot)edu for more information.

Date: Thursday, February 23
Time:
 12 – 1 PM
Location: 
Shapiro Creative Writing Center Lounge (Allbritton 318)

Applications for the Fellowships are due on Friday, March 30. Visit the Writing at Wesleyan webpage for further information and application requirements for the Ford Fellowship and the Shapiro Center/Russell House Arts Fellowship.

An Honors Information Session will be taking place on Thursday, September 15, at 4:15 p.m. in PAC 001.  If you are writing an honors thesis or pursuing any other avenue to honors available in your major, this is your opportunity to have your questions answered.  The meeting will be facilitated by Susan Krajewski, Honors Coordinator in the Registrar’s office, and David Phillips, Dean for the Class of 2012.

More information about Wesleyan’s Honors Program is available through the Registrar’s Office at http://www.wesleyan.edu/registrar/honors/honors_program.html

Hope to see you there!

An Honors Information Session will be taking place this Wednesday, April 13, at 4:15 p.m. in PAC 001.  If you are thinking about writing an honors thesis or pursuing any other avenue to honors available in your major, this is your opportunity to have your questions answered.  The meeting will be facilitated by Susan Krajewski, Honors Coordinator in the Registrar’s office, and David Phillips, Dean for the Class of 2012.

More information about Wesleyan’s Honors Program is available through the Registrar’s Office at http://www.wesleyan.edu/registrar/honors.htt

Hope to see you there!

All members of the junior class are invited to apply for a semester-long Student Fellowship at the Center for the Humanities during the 2011-12 academic year. Wesleyan’s is among the first such university humanities centers established and serves to bring together Wesleyan faculty, students and visiting scholars for extended exploration of selected subjects. Our 2011-12 themes are “Fact and Artifact” (Fall semester) and “Visceral States: Affect and Civic Life” (Spring semester).  Descriptions of these themes are appended below.

Four Student Fellowships are awarded by the Center’s Advisory Board for each semester.  Student Fellows share an office at the Center and take part in Center activities. Among these events are the Center’s Monday lecture series; colloquial discussions on Tuesdays, 10:30-1:00; and occasional Center conferences. One course credit is awarded for a Student Fellow’s participation in the Center’s activities.

Applicants for a Student Fellowship must be planning to do a senior project (an honors thesis) on a topic related to the Center theme for the year.  The project need not be underway at the time of the application.  The themes, “Fact and Artifact” and “Visceral States: Affect and Civic Life,” are broadly construed and connect with projects and problems across the disciplines. Faculty Fellows who will work at the Center during Fall semester are Professors Askamija (Art History), Autry (Sociology), Fullilove (History), Stark (Sociology and Environmental Studies), and Tucker (History, SISP, FGSS). Faculty Fellows who will work at the Center during the spring semester are Professors Chakravarti (Government and Social Studies), Kauanui (American Studies and Anthropology), Rodriguez Mosquera (Psychology), Visvardi (Classical Studies), and Wright (African American Studies and History). There will also several Visiting Research Fellows and Postdoctoral Fellows.

More information about the fellowship and the application process is available on the Center for the Humanities website at http://www.wesleyan.edu/chum/student_fellowship_09_10.html

Applications for student fellowships are due at the Center by Friday, March 25th.

Please visit http://www.wesleyan.edu/chum and follow the Student Fellowship link for application.

Application Deadline: March 25, 2011

All members of the junior class are invited to apply for a semester-long Student Fellowship at the Center for the Humanities during the 2011-12 academic year. Wesleyan’s is among the first such university humanities centers established and serves to bring together Wesleyan faculty, students and visiting scholars for extended exploration of selected subjects. Our 2011-12 themes are “Fact and Artifact” (Fall semester) and “Visceral States: Affect and Civic Life” (Spring semester).  Descriptions of these themes are appended below.

Four Student Fellowships are awarded by the Center’s Advisory Board for each semester.  Student Fellows share an office at the Center and take part in Center activities. Among these events are the Center’s Monday lecture series; colloquial discussions on Tuesdays, 10:30-1:00; and occasional Center conferences. One course credit is awarded for a Student Fellow’s participation in the Center’s activities.

Applicants for a Student Fellowship must be planning to do a senior project (an honors thesis) on a topic related to the Center theme for the year.  The project need not be underway at the time of the application.  The themes, “Fact and Artifact” and “Visceral States: Affect and Civic Life,” are broadly construed and connect with projects and problems across the disciplines. Faculty Fellows who will work at the Center during Fall semester are Professors Askamija (Art History), Autry (Sociology), Fullilove (History), Stark (Sociology and Environmental Studies), and Tucker (History, SISP, FGSS). Faculty Fellows who will work at the Center during the spring semester are Professors Chakravarti (Government and Social Studies), Kauanui (American Studies and Anthropology), Rodriguez Mosquera (Psychology), Visvardi (Classical Studies), and Wright (African American Studies and History). There will also several Visiting Research Fellows and Postdoctoral Fellows.

Applications for student fellowships are due at the Center by Wednesday, March 25th.

We will let you know of the Center Advisory Board’s decision by April 6.  If you have any questions, please call the Center at extension 3044. An open house for interested students will be held on Tuesday, March 1, 4:00-5:00 p.m in the Center for the Humanities lounge.

Next Year’s Themes:

Fact and Artifact (Fall 2011)

To what extent has the modern fact been redefined as artifact, as an entity shaped by human hands? Scholars have at once recognized the production of facts about the empirical world as a central achievement of modernity and redefined facts not as paragons of objectivity but as markers of human intervention. Facts thus are alternately seen as a triumph of knowing or as products of social processes shaped by tools of witness, communities of inquiry, and methods of narration. Scholars of language, art, narrative, historical epistemology, philosophy, and archaeology have contributed to our understanding of how people fashion facts, which may in turn be accepted as veridical statements about reality or called into question as the conceptions of interested and historically situated human beings. They have explored, for instance, the practices and technologies used in apprehending the natural world: e.g. those used when collecting plants for herbaria and gene banks, or when tagging nutrients with radioisotopes. They have considered, too, the epistemological claims of aesthetic realism, the implication of historical facts in rhetorically constructed narratives, and the very possibility of establishing objects of knowledge in the humanities as facts in the sense in which that term has been used in the sciences. These investigations draw and redraw the lines between fact and artifact and fact and fiction – that is, not what we know to be true or false, but rather how we think we know it.

The Center invites applications examining the career of the modern fact and its uncomfortable companion, the artifact.

Under what conditions can facts be created? How do efforts to pin down empirical reality gain access to the material world? How do they depend upon symbolic or aesthetic logics of representation or produce such representations? What is at stake in the legal and moral order of facts? Does new knowledge change people’s aesthetic or moral sensibilities or alter their understandings of their first-hand experiences? What light can the study of artifacts shed on the status and function of facts in our world?

Visceral States: Affect and Civil Life (Spring 2012)

The term “affect” encompasses a range of bodily and social experiences that has traditionally been defined in contradistinction to rationality: visceral reactions, feelings, emotional attachments, and states of mood. Recent studies across the disciplines, from literature to political theory to neuroscience, have complicated this definition by according a foundational role to affect in human behavior and cognition. These inquiries destabilize the grounds on which affect has been excluded from rationalist discourses in both academic and public realms. This “affective turn” thus affords new possibilities for understanding aesthetics, reasoning, art, personal experience, power and the civic sphere, posing as well new problems for the conceptualization of feelings, emotion, and mood.

The Center invites applications examining the possibilities and challenges accompanying new attention to the complex relations between emotional subjectivities, visceral experiences, and public life.  Our inquiry is organized around a broad scope of intra- and interdisciplinary questions, including: can the deployment or solicitation of affect in civil life be understood as complementary to—or even partially constitutive of—reasoned debate? How might fields such as moral philosophy, social theory, and psychology adjudicate between canonical rationalist frameworks and those proposing constitutive dynamics of affect? To what extent do aesthetic representations and practices provide grounds for new approaches to the interplay of affect, subjectivity, and sentiment in social life?

This is a reminder that the General Wesleyan Permission to Study Abroad Application is due ON TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2011 for all students planning to study abroad for the fall 2011 semester or Full Year 2011-2012. This is the “permission to study abroad” application that ALL students must complete, regardless of program choice, including Wesleyan-administered programs (Bologna, Madrid, Paris). Applications must be turned in at the Office of International Studies, 105 Fisk Hall and may be turned in anytime between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on March 1.

A copy of the permission application may be picked up at the Office of International Studies or printed from our website at www.wesleyan.edu/ois. Just click on “Applications” in the “Forms” bucket and print the “Permission to Study Abroad” PDF document.

A complete application includes the following 7 items:

  • Personal information sheet
  • Academic justification essay
  • Online Health Information Clearance form*
  • Pre-approval of courses form**
  • Student Medical Release and Parental Statement form
  • Assumption of Risk and Release and Waiver form
  • Standards of Conduct Pledge

*All applicants must complete our online Health Information Clearance form. If you have not already done so, you may still do it now. It is in your student e-Portfolio under “Tools and Links.” Be sure to do this by March 1, 2011.

**Please note that IF YOU ARE IN YOUR MAJOR DECLARATION SEMESTER, the Coursework Abroad approval form (page 3) is not due until April 1. ALL OTHER FORMS ARE DUE MARCH 1.

If you have any questions about the “permission to study abroad application,” please feel free to stop by the office during drop-in hours (M-W-F 10-noon; T-TH 2-4 p.m.) or call us at 860 685 2550.

Please note that approved programs (not run by Wesleyan) have their own specific deadlines (many do “rolling admissions” and can fill before stated deadlines) so students should check directly with the programs to make certain that applications are filed in a timely manner.

The College of the Environment internships allow students to undertake research on environmental topics under the guidance of a faculty mentor during the Summer or Fall, 2011. The scope of environmental topics is meant in the broad sense and the research may be undertaken using techniques, approaches and paradigms from all majors or major programs. Internships are available to Wesleyan Students across the entire University.

The summer internship will run from May 25, 2011 – July 29, 2011, while the Fall 2011 internship would run the term of the semester. Internships carry a stipend of $4,000.

The deadline for applications is due on or before Monday, February 21, 2011, allowing us to announce internship candidates by Friday, March 4th, prior to spring break. Student applications are to be delivered to Ms. Valerie Marinelli, Administrative Assistant, College of the Environment, 284 High Street.  Click here to download an application.

The student application also requires two short letters of recommendation from Wesleyan faculty. In addition to recommending the student, the faculty mentor must briefly (1-2 paragraphs) explain the project, its importance and relevance to her/his research program. Letters of recommendation may either be sent to Ms. Marinelli through campus mail or by email (pdf preferred) to vmarinelli@wesleyan.edu.

To get the application, please stop by the College of the Environment, 284 High Street or check with any Administrative Assistant on campus who has received the email.

The applications, including statements by faculty, will be judged by the oversight and awards committee.

For further information, please contact Valerie Marinelli at (860) 685-3733.

This is a reminder that applications for Fall 2011 or Year 2011-12 for the Wesleyan-administered programs in Paris, Madrid, and Bologna are due TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2011 BY 5:00 P.M. This is a firm deadline and late applications will not be accepted. Applications must be turned in to the Office of International Studies, Fisk Hall 105. A complete application includes the following four items:

  • Application personal information sheets
  • 250-word essay in the appropriate language, explaining why you wish to participate on the program
  • Language evaluation form (to be completed by your current or most recent language professor)
  • Letter of recommendation from a non-language professor (may be sent through campus mail, delivered to our office, or sent as an e-mail attachment or as the text of an email to gwinter@wesleyan.edu)

The applications can be downloaded from our website at http://www.wesleyan.edu/ois/forms/application2.htt

Applicants to Wesleyan-administered programs must also complete the general Permission to Study Abroad Application which is due Tuesday, March 1, 2011. Completed general applications must be turned in to the Office of International Studies, Fisk Hall 105.

The Office of International Studies is offering the following information sessions over the next week:

Tuesday, Feb. 8
Queen Mary, University of London

Noon – 1 p.m.
Fisk Hall 302

Wednesday, Feb 9
The Swedish Program

Noon – 1:00 p.m.
Fisk Hall 210

Tuesday, Feb 15
Nanzan University, Nagoya, Japan

4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Fisk Hall 302

Monday, February 21, 12:00 noon
Usdan 108

Join Barry Chernoff, Director from the College of the Environment, as he discusses the Environmental Studies Program, encompassing the linked major, think tank and the certificate program. A pizza lunch will be served. Please RSVP by Feb 16 in order to place your order. For more information, please contact Valerie Marinelli at vmarinelli@wesleyan.edu or 860-685-3733.

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