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Monthly Archive for February, 2010

  • dodgeballWant to win some money?
  • Want to help with Haiti relief?
  • Want to kick some butt with your friends?

You can do all three!

Play In The “Have A Heart For Haiti” Dodgeball Tournament

Sunday, February 14th At 2:00 p.mm
Bacon Field House
Entry Deadline:  February 10th

Bring 5 of your friends, $20, some cool outfits, and a competitive attitude.

Proceeds split 1/3 for the winning team & 2/3 for Partners In Health.
Sign up to play and find the details online!

http://www.wesleyan.edu/deans/2013council/dodgeball.html

Calling all musicians, singers and performers!

Musical Madness: Competition between the Classes
Thursday, February 18, 7:00 p.m.
Crowell Concert Hall

Acoustic, electric or a cappella
Ensemble or solo, original or cover, any genre

Prizes for

  • Best in Class
  • Best in Show
  • Judges’ Choice

Get Your Act Together and Feel the Love

Entry Deadline:  February 11. Click on this link to enter: http://www.wesleyan.edu/deans/musicalmadness/entry.html.

Here’s a video of the band “Michael Roth” playing “Reason Why,” which was late year’s “Best in Class” winner from the Class of 2012:

The following departments will be hosting Major Declaration Open Houses this week:

  • Chemistry
    Wednesday, Feb. 10, 12:00-1:00 p.m.

    Woodhead Lounge
    Exley Science Center
    Lunch
  • East Asian Studies
    Thursday, Feb. 11, 4:30 p.m.

    Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies
    343 Washington Terrace
    Asian Buffet
  • English
    Thursday, Feb. 11, 4:15-6:00 p.m.

    Russell House
    Groovy Treats

For more information about the major declaration process, check out the Major Declaration website at http://www.wesleyan.edu/deans/major_declaration/

“Creating the Creative” is a provocative quote from Herman Melville’s experimental novel, Mardi (1849).  It can be argued that Melville here was referring to the creative energy of a literary text to keep generating meanings with readers and changing times.  Three inspiring and distinguished Wesleyan writers who have taught at Wesleyan will read from their work:  Kit Reed, Clifford Chase, and Douglas Martin (visiting writers Chase and Martin are teaching English courses this term).  They will be introduced by the English Department Creative Writing Concentration Faculty: Silverberg Shapiro Professor of Creative Writing and Coordinator of the Creative Writing Concentration Elizabeth Willis, Professor of English Deb Unferth, and Professor of English Lisa Cohen.  Joel Pfister, Chair of the English Department and Kenan Professor of the Humanities, will introduce the event.  So come see Wesleyan artists who create the creative on Wednesday, February 10, 8:00 Russell House! Cool treats will be served!

Davison Health Center and local healthcare facilities are seeing a spike in cases of gastroenteritis (vomiting and/or diarrhea), probably viral in nature.  The onset has been sudden, often waking students from sleep with a bout of nausea and vomiting, accompanied in some cases by headache, dizziness, sense of temperature disequilibrium and fatigue.  In some cases the diarrhea has started immediately, but in most it starts about 12 hours after the vomiting, which has usually resolved by that time.

The route of transmission of these infections is typically fecal-oral, specifically failure to wash hands properly after using the toilet and before food preparation and/or consumption.

Viral gastroenteritis infections are readily transmitted to others, especially in a close community such as Wesleyan.  The time of maximal viral shedding (contagious phase) is in the first 24-48 hours.  Persons are considered non-contagious after 72 hours.  Although recovery is typically rapid (24-48 hours) and complete, the intervening hours are miserable.  Caution on the part of the well and responsible behavior on the part of the ill can drastically reduce the number of individuals affected.

To optimally protect yourself, please do the following:

  • Thoroughly wash hands with soap immediately after using the toilet and before handling any food or drinks.  If soap is unavailable, waterless sanitizer is a good second choice.  (Because the causative organisms are viral, there is no special advantage to anti-bacterial preparations.)
  • Avoid sharing towels, cups, silverware, toothbrushes and other personal items.
  • Consider avoiding communal foods whereby several people may come in contact with the food you eat, such as bowls of chips or bags of popcorn.

If you become ill, please do the following:

  • Stay in your room and rest.
    • During the vomiting phase, avoid putting anything into your stomach:  it will only cause more vomiting.  Wait until a few hours after last bout of vomiting, and then try a few sips of bottled water (Middletown tap water can upset sensitive stomachs) or ginger ale.  Sports drinks, too, are to be avoided as they often make nausea worse.  Dehydration is unlikely to become a significant issue during the short duration of this phase of the illness.
    • During the diarrhea phase, assuming the nausea has relented and appetite is returning, do make a concerted effort to keep up with fluid loss by drinking bottled water, ginger ale, or other gentle beverages.  Optimally you should be urinating every 60-90 minutes and urine should be clear or light in color.  Dark or burning urine suggests that fluid intake is sub-optimal.
  • Be very conscientious about hand washing and avoidance of exposing others, especially in the first three days after becoming ill.
  • Once your appetite begins to return, slowly reintroduce solid foods focusing on bland foods such as bananas, rice, applesauce and toast.
  • Expect that for a few days after this you will be more sensitive to certain foods, especially lactose-containing foods.  It is also common and normal to have a relative disinhibition of the gastro-colic reflex (normal in infants, suppressed in adults) such that you will have the urge to have a bowel movement soon after eating.

If you have questions or concerns, please contact the Health Center at (860) 685-2470.

“How to Write a Love Poem That Doesn’t Suck” is actually the title of a poem and it is the perfect title for this creative event!  This first-time-ever writing workshop is just for frosh and sophomores, and it will introduce those who attend to the artfulness and energy of English at Wesleyan.  Frosh and sophomores interested in trying their hand at writing on the theme of love–poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction–can receive guidance from the English Department’s exciting Creative Writing Concentration faculty:  Silverberg Shapiro Professor of Creative Writing and Coordinator of the Creative Writing Concentration Elizabeth Willis (poetry), Professor of English Deb Unferth (fiction), and Professor of English Lisa Cohen (creative non-fiction). Joel Pfister, Chair of the English Department and Kenan Professor of the Humanities, will introduce his talented colleagues.  It all takes place on Wednesday, February 10, 4:15 Downey Lounge! Frosh and sophomores who love to write creatively (or who would love to try writing creatively) can write creatively about LOVE!  Go for it!  Groovy treats will be served!

Now that Drop/Add is over, you are required to confirm your class schedule. Please log on to your portfolio and navigate to “Current Classes & Schedule” under “Wesleyan Career”. If you agree that our records correctly show the courses that you registered for during Drop/Add, click on “Schedule is Correct”. If your schedule is not correct (for example, a course is missing from your schedule or an additional course is appearing) click on “Schedule is Incorrect” and you’ll be given further instructions and a link to the petition form. Later, if your petition is successful and your schedule is corrected, you should return to your schedule page and click “Schedule is Correct”. The schedule confirmation buttons will remain on the page until you have resolved all issues and click the “Schedule is Correct” button.

Please indicate whether your schedule is correct or incorrect by Wednesday, February 10th. The sooner you let us know about problems with your schedule, the sooner your issues can be resolved. If you fail to indicate whether your schedule is correct or not, you risk not being allowed to participate in April pre-registration for Fall 2010 courses.

Grading mode and cross-listing changes were due before the end of the Drop/Add period and can no longer be made.

If you have any questions, please contact the Registrar’s Office at x2810.

Department Chair Date Location
African American Studies (AFAM) Ashraf Rushdy Wednesday, Feb. 24
4:15-5:30 p.m.
Pizza
CAAS Lounge
343 High Street
American Studies (AMST) Patricia Hill Thursday, Feb. 25
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Center for the Americas
Rooms 1 and 2
255 High Street
Anthropology (ANTH) Elizabeth Traube Monday, Feb. 22
4:15-5:30 p.m.
Light Refreshments
Anthropology Department
Anth 6 Classroom
281 High Street
Archaeology (ARCP) Douglas Charles Thursday, Feb. 18
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Downey House Lounge
Room 200
294 High Street
Art History (ARHA) Elizabeth Milroy Thursday, Feb. 25
4:30-5:30 p.m.
Refreshments
Davison Art Center
Dining Room
Art Studio (ARST) Tula Telfair Tuesday, Feb. 23
4:30 p.m.
Refreshments
Zilkha Gallery
Room 202
Astronomy (ASTR) Ed Moran No Open House Scheduled
Biology (BIOL) Sonia Sultan Wednesday, Feb. 24
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza and Salad Lunch
Exley Science Center
Woodhead Lounge
Chemistry (CHEM) Joseph Knee Wednesday, Feb. 10
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Exley Science Center
Woodhead Lounge
Classical Studies (CCIV) Michael Roberts Tuesday, Feb. 23
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Downey House Lounge
Room 200
294 High Street
Computer Science (COMP) Karen Collins Thursday, Feb. 25
12:05-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Exley Science Center
Rm 601
Math Lounge
Environmental Studies Barry Chernoff Tuesday, Feb. 16
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Usdan 108
Dance (DANC) Nicole Stanton Wednesday, Feb. 24
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Refreshments
Dance and Theater Building
Jones Room
Earth & Environmental Studies (E&ES) Peter Patton No Open House Scheduled
East Asian Studies (EAST) Vera Schwarcz Thursday, Feb. 11
4:30 p.m.
Asian Buffet
Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies
343 Washington Terrace
Economics (ECON)
Math-Econ (MECO)
Gil Skillman Tuesday, Feb. 16
12:15-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
CSS Lounge
4th Floor PAC
English (ENGL) Joel Pfister Thursday, Feb. 11
4:15-6:00 p.m.
Groovy Treats
Russell House
Feminist, Gender & Sexuality Studies (FGSS) Natasha Korda Thursday, Feb. 18
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Allbritton 311
Film Studies (FILM) Jeanine Basinger No Open House Scheduled
German Studies (GRST) Leo Lensing Wednesday, Feb. 17
4:30 p.m.
Refreshments
Fisk 404
Government (GOVT) John Finn No Open House Scheduled
History (HIST) William Pinch Tuesday, Feb. 23
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch and Refreshments
CSS Lounge
4th Floor PAC
Latin American Studies (LAST) Ann Wightman Tuesday, Feb. 23
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Center for the Americas
Rooms 1 and 2
255 High Street
Mathematics (MATH) Karen Collins Thursday, Feb. 25
12:00-12:50 p.m.
Lunch
Exley Science Center
Rm 601
Math Lounge
Medieval Studies (MDST) Jeff Rider Wednesday, Feb. 17
4:14-5:15 p.m.
Center for Humanities 206
Molecular Biology & Biochemistry (MB&B) Michael McAlear Thursday, Feb. 25
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Exley Science Center
Woodhead Lounge
Music (MUSC) Su Zheng Wednesday, Feb. 17
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
World Music Hall
Neuroscience and Behavior (NS&B) John Kirn Wednesday, Feb. 17
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
Exley Science Center
Woodhead Lounge
Philosophy (PHIL) Stephen Angle Tuesday, Feb. 23
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Sandwiches/Drinks
Allbritton 311
Physics (PHYS) Reinhold Blumel Tuesday, Feb. 16
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Lunch
255 Exley Science Center
Physics Cady Lounge
Psychology (PSYC) Lisa Dierker No Open House Scheduled
Religion (RELI) Peter Gottschalk Tuesday, Feb. 16
4:15-6:00 p.m.
Refreshments
Religious Studies Seminar Room
171 Church Street
Romance Languages & Literatures
French Studies (FRST)
Italian Studies (ITAL)
Romance Studies
Spanish (SPAN)
Iberian Studies (IBST)
Catherine Poisson Monday, Feb. 22
4:15-6:15 p.m.
Snacks & Refreshments
RL&L Common Room
300 High Street
Russian & East European Studies (REES)
Russian Language & Literature (RUSS)
Susanne Fusso Wednesday, Feb. 24
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Fisk Hall
Room 215
Science in Society (SISP) Joseph Rouse Thursday, Feb. 25
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
Allbritton 311
Sociology (SOC) Jonathan Cutler Thursday, Feb. 25
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Pizza Lunch
PAC 107
Theater (THEA) John Carr Thursday, Feb. 18
4:15-6:00 p.m.
Refreshments
Theater & Dance Studios
East Room

Wesleyan students must declare a major during the second semester of the sophomore year.  As a member of the Class of 2012, this means that you must declare a major–and have it approved by department or interdisciplinary program into which you are seeking admission–by Friday, March 5.  Once you have been admitted to a major, you will receive major preference for courses in your department or program when course Pre-Registration takes place in April.  Please be aware that each department has its own processes and procedures for admitting students into its major program, so it is important that you consult with an advising expert in your intended department before you initiate the major declaration process.

In any case, you are strongly encouraged to undertake the following before making any final decisions about what to major in:

Once you have decided which major you will be applying for, you must login to your e-portfolio to officially begin the major declaration process.  In your student portfolio, navigate to the “Wesleyan Career” bucket and click on the “Major Declaration” link.  In the dropdown menu that appears on the next page, select the department you have decided to apply to and click the “Submit Major” button.  Clicking the “Submit Major” button sends a message to the department with your request to declare the major; an automated email message to you will then confirm that your request has been received. Clicking on the submit button also provides the department with access to your academic history.  Depending on the major you are declaring, it is possible that the department may require you to submit additional information or meet with a member of the department.  If the department approves your request to join the major, this approval will noted on the “Major Declaration” page in your portfolio (the same page from which you initiated the declaration process).  If you are declaring a second major, simply repeat this process.

An important feature of the major declaration process is the Pre-Major Advising Survey.  After submitting your major declaration request, you will be prompted to submit feedback regarding your advising experiences over the past three semesters.  Your answers will be kept confidential and will be made available to your former advisor at the beginning of the summer as a tool to improve his or her advising.  You must complete the Pre-Major Advising Survey before your major declaration request to be forwarded to the department for review.

Individual departments and programs have different procedures for assigning advisors to students.  For this reason, once you have been accepted into your major it is important that you contact the department chair to initiate the process of finding an advisor.  Your major advisor will work with you through Course Pre-Registration in April and will help you design your program of study over the next four semesters.

If you are unable to declare your major by the Friday, March 5 deadline because, for example, you are currently completing a prerequisite course, you must submit a Major Deferral form to me so that I will know that you are still in the process of gaining entry into a major.  You will be required to communicate your plans with the chair of your intended department or program.  You must also identify an alternate major in case you are not accepted into your first choice.

If you have any questions or concerns about the major declaration process, or if you are feeling anxious or unsure about meeting the major declaration deadline, please contact me as soon as possible at dphillips@wesleyan.edu or 860.685.2757.  Please keep in mind that while choosing a major is a milestone in your college career, it is not a decision that will affect all aspects of your future in a profound or irreversible way.  That may sound like heresy, but it is true.  This is not to say that your major is irrelevant or insignificant, but it is important to know that there are many myths surrounding one’s choice of a major.  These myths–for example, that only certain majors lead to certain careers–can be the source of a lot of unnecessary anxiety and stress and I would be happy to dispel them for you.

Best wishes for a successful semester!

David Phillips
Dean for the Class of 2012

Applications for Fall 2010 or Year 2010-11 for the Wesleyan-administered programs in Paris, Madrid, and Bologna are due Monday, February 15, 2010 by 5:00 p.m. This is a firm deadline and late applications will not be accepted. Applications must be turned in to the Office of International Studies, Fisk Hall 105. A complete application includes the following four items:

  • Application personal information sheets
  • 250-word essay in the appropriate language, explaining why you wish to participate on the program
  • Language evaluation form (to be completed by your current or most recent language professor)
  • Letter of recommendation from a non-language professor (may be sent through campus mail, delivered to our office, or sent as an e-mail attachment or as the text of an email to gwinter@wesleyan.edu)

Applicants to Wesleyan-administered programs must also complete the general Permission to Study Abroad Application which is due Monday, March 1, 2010. Completed general applications must be turned in to the Office of International Studies, Fisk Hall 105.

Limited funds are available to support student research and other student scholarly projects in public affairs to begin this summer.  Only current sophomores and juniors are eligible.  These funds are made available through a gift to Wesleyan University from the Surdna Foundation in honor of Frederick Morgan Davenport, Wesleyan University Class of 1889, and Edith Jefferson Andrus Davenport, Wesleyan University, Class of 1897.

In past years, Davenport Scholarships have been awarded to sophomores and juniors who have “demonstrated intellectual and moral excellence and a concern for public affairs” and “who by their personal qualities and vocational and scholarly intentions give greatest promise of leadership in the public service.”  It is expected that most of the grants will be concentrated in the social science departments and the CSS, but applications will be accepted from majors in all areas of the University as long as the proposed projects are related to public affairs.

Applications must contain: (1) a title, (2) a brief description of the proposed project, its objectives and its significance, including a discussion of the relevant scholarly literature; (3) a statement discussing course work relating to the proposed project; (4) an account of the methods for carrying it out; (5) a timetable for completion [a project may continue through the academic year 2009-2010]; (6) a detailed budget; (7) a copy of the student’s transcript [which you may copy from your portfolio if you wish],CSS students please include your comprehensive Examination grade, and (8) a letter from the faculty member who will supervise the project, carefully assessing its merit and the ability of the applicant to carry it out successfully.  Applications must be electronically submitted AS AN ATTACHMENT and are not to exceed five double-spaced pages (not counting the supervisor’s letter or transcript). It is the applicant’s responsibility to inform his or her faculty supervisor to submit a letter electronically AS AN ATTACHMENT. Both the application and the faculty member’s letter must contain the student’s name (with the last name listed first) followed by “Davenport Proposal” in the subject line.

Funds are limited, and we expect competition for the awards to be keen. The committee will examine each proposal closely, with special attention to the scholarly value of the proposed research, the feasibility of the project, and the reasonableness of the proposed budget.  Students should make their proposals as specific and detailed as possible, and support them with evidence of their ability to complete the work according to a realistic schedule.  They should prepare the budget with special care, including only essential expenses and showing precisely how the proposed budget supports the work being proposed. Please note that your budget cannot include the purchase of capital equipment (i.e., digital recorders, cameras, etc.). Those planning to do research abroad should consult with Carolyn Sorkin in the Office of International Studies about their plans and budgets. Please note that research proposals involving human subjects may require IRB approval; please see http://www.wesleyan.edu/acaf/Institutional_Review_Board.html for additional information.

All Davenport Scholars will receive a minimum of $500, as stipulated by the terms of the Davenport Bequest.  Additional amounts of up to $2500 may be awarded, the amount depending on the availability of funds and project needs.  Total awards will generally be limited to $3000, but successful applicants can apply for modest supplements if, during their projects, it appears that the $3000 limit is too restrictive.  An interim report, 3-5 pages in length, is to be submitted in September. This report should describe the work done with the grant money over the course of the summer and how this work will advance the student’s thesis or other honors projects during the coming year. Upon completion of the project, each Davenport Scholar must submit a brief report to the Committee on his/her activities, accomplishments, and an accounting of expenditures beyond $500.

Applications will be judged by a faculty committee composed of representatives of the five Public Affairs Center departments.  Criteria for judging applications include: the relevance of the project to public affairs; the clarity and suitability of the project design; the feasibility of the proposed project; the applicant’s past academic record; the evaluation submitted by the faculty member; and the realism of the proposed budget.  Senior thesis projects will receive priority.

All materials including faculty recommendations must be submitted electronically to Davenport grant (davenport@wesleyan.edu), by noon, Friday, March 12, 2010.  On the top of the first page, please include your WES I.D., Wesleyan Box No., email address, name of faculty advisor who will be submitting a recommendation (if your thesis advisor will be someone else, that person should also be listed here), as well as your citizenship for tax purposes.  Announcement of grant awards will be made on or before April 5, 2010. Titles of successful applications will also be posted on the PAC website, www.wesleyan.edu/pac.

Udall Scholarship

In 2010, the Foundation expects to award 80 scholarships of up to $5000 and 50 honorable mentions of $350 to sophomore and junior level college students committed to careers related to the environment, tribal public policy, or Native American health care.

Scholarships are offered in any of three categories:

  • To students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to the environment; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to tribal public policy; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to Native health care.

The Udall Foundation seeks future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, and economics.

The Udall Foundation seeks future Native American and Alaska Native leaders in Native American health care and tribal public policy. Tribal policy includes fields related to tribal sovereignty, tribal governance, tribal law, Native American education, Native American justice, natural resource management, cultural preservation and revitalization, Native American economic development, and other areas affecting Native American communities. Native American health care includes health care administration, social work, medicine, and research into health conditions affecting Native American communities.

More information is available at  www.udall.gov.  Contact David Phillips, Dean for the Class of 2012 (dphillips@wesleyan.edu, x2757) if you are interested in applying.

Applications are now available for the Environmental Studies Mellon Research Internship. You can obtain an application from our website (www.wesleyan.edu/environmentalstudies/).

Internships are for a duration of 9 and a half weeks and carry a stipend of $3,900. The summer internship will run from May 26 – July 30, 2010, while the Fall internship would run the term of the semester.

Applications are due in the Environmental Studies Program Office (Exley Science Center, Room 331) on or before 26 February 2010. Internships are for either Summer or Fall 2010. You must have 2 letters of recommendation submitted by that same date. One letter should be from your faculty mentor, the second from another member of the Wesleyan faculty. Awards will be announced by 5 March 2010.

The student application seeks two short letters of recommendation.  In addition to recommending the student, the faculty mentor must briefly (1-2 paragraphs) explain the project, its importance and relevance to her/his research program.  Letters of recommendation may either be sent to Ms. Marinelli through campus mail or by email (pdf preferred) to vmarinelli@wesleyan.edu.

The applications, including statements by faculty, will be judged by the oversight and awards committee.

For further information, please contact Valerie Marinelli at 685-3733.

Meets: Wednesdays
Time: 8:00 p.m.
Location:  Group Room #212
(2nd floor, Davison Health Center)

Intended to create a network of support for those who have experienced the death of a loved one.  Please feel free to come and leave when it’s convenient for you.  If you have questions, please contact: Kendall (512/296-3521).

Sponsored by the Office of Behavioral Health for Students.

The Colin Higgins Foundation is accepting nominations for its annual Youth Courage Awards. Through these annual awards, the foundation salutes LGBTQ youth who demonstrate courage in the face of adversity and discrimination based on gender and/or sexual orientation.

In 2010, three honorees will each receive a $10,000 grant to be presented in New York City at the Trevor Project Benefit Gala in June. Honorees will also receive an expense-paid trip to the 2011 National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Creating Change Conference.

The award program seeks nominations of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Two-Spirit, and Queer youth (through the age of 21) who have bravely stood up to hostility and intolerance based on their gender and/or sexual orientation and triumphed over bigotry through working for LGBTQ rights and social justice.

Nominees must be 21 or under and must be U.S. citizens. Self-nominations are not accepted.

Complete program guidelines and nomination forms are available at the foundation’s Web site.

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